Shipcraft on Human Scale

CVA 99-2527 Vancouver Shipyards taken for Mitchell Printing. 1931. Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-2527 Vancouver Shipyards taken for Mitchell Printing. 1931. Stuart Thomson photo.

This photo is of the hull of a small pleasure craft under construction at Vancouver’s Shipyards at the opening of the 1930s (and located then at the corner of Georgia and Thurlow, near where the Shangrila building is today). A decade later, construction of such a human-scale water craft would be almost unthinkable. In the 1940s, with Canada’s focus fully on producing war-related products, spending this kind of time, attention and material on pleasure would be seen as quite decadent. In the new decade, Vancouver’s shipyards would become associated almost exclusively with building big troop movers and other war-related craft. The building of the much larger warcraft would take place on the waterfront at locations like the North Vancouver drydocks and West Coast Shipyards on False Creek.

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2 Responses to Shipcraft on Human Scale

  1. Sheila says:

    Wow! Working on small pleasure craft at the Vancouver Shipyard in the 30’s would have been such a fantastic job!

  2. Nice! Interesting to think of how that would have been a dormant skill through the war years.

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