Bob’s Market

CVA 447-331 - Robson and Howe [Streets S.E. corner] 1968 WE Frost photo.

CVA 447-331 – Robson and Howe [Streets S.E. corner] 1968 WE Frost photo.

This was once the downtown site of Chapters bookstore. Rumour has it that a sportswear arm of Canadian Tire will be the next retail resident of the SE corner of Robson and Howe. At the location where Anne Muirhead Florist was in the late 60s, I think there was in the 1990s another bookstore; this one was an antiquarian shop and, if memory serves, its specialty was art and music-related books and scores. I believe the owner moved his stock to the North Shore after leaving this site.

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Canterbury Coffee Shop

Crop of CVA 294-63 - [The Kitsilano Boys Band in a parade on Burrard Street] 1946-48 Bertram Emery photo.

Crop of CVA 294-63 – [The Kitsilano Boys Band in a parade on Burrard Street] 1946-48 Bertram Emery photo.

This photo makes me smile. It shows one of my favourite things (a coffee shop) on one of my most frequented walking streets (Burrard) and features a marching band, to boot! The band appears to be on one of the breaks that’s necessary for marching bands (I presume) — if for no other reason than to catch their collective breath before beginning the next tune. (Strangely, this sound of relative silence is one I can readily conjure from my memory of bands I’ve seen at the Calgary Stampede and elsewhere over the years: the sounds of people marching more or less in unison with perhaps an errant cymbal tinkle or other percussive ‘oops’ as they march past). If I’m not greatly mistaken, a number of eyes of this ‘boy’s band’ are turned toward the marching minority: the young girl banner holder and the majorette just behind her!

What had been on this northwest corner of Burrard and Pender before the coffee shop? The corner had housed, among other things, a dairy (indeed an ad for Empress Dairies can still be made out in this image on the wall of the building closer to the Marine Building).

By 1953, this block was changing dramatically; the home of Canterbury Cafe was demolished (see first image below) and was replaced by a federal Customs House (which endured from 1955 until, in turn, it was demolished in 1993). The mid-century modern Customs House (CBK Norman, architect) was replaced with the current structure (at 401 Burrard St), the federal government building named in honour of Douglas Jung (1924-2002), Canada’s first Member of Parliament of Chinese origin (MP Vancouver Centre, 1957-62).

Crop of CVA 180-7871 - Soldiers in P.N.E. parade heading north on Burrard Street, near Pender Street 1953.

Crop of CVA 180-7871 – Soldiers in P.N.E. parade heading north on Burrard Street, near Pender Street 1953. (Note the “Please Excuse the Noise” notice from the developer!)

Crop of CVA 447-72 - New Customs Bldg. [1001 West Pender St.] 1955 WE Frost photo.

Crop of CVA 447-72 – New Customs Bldg. [1001 West Pender St.] 1955 WE Frost photo. (Note: This photograph appears to have been made from the corner of Hastings and Burrard, rather from the Pender corner).

Posted in Bertram Emery, cafes/restaurants/eateries, music, people, W. E. Frost | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Early Vancouver Art Gallery

CVA 677-711.11 - City Museum and Art Gallery, part of west wall, Vancouver, B.C. 1932 PT Timms.

CVA 677-711.11 – City Museum and Art Gallery, part of west wall, Vancouver, B.C. 1932 PT Timms.

This is an early incarnation of the Vancouver Art Gallery (which was housed at this time in the same building as the City Museum (the ancestor of the Museum of Vancouver) and the Vancouver Public Library. All three were in the structure known today as the Carnegie Community Centre, which still houses VPL’S Carnegie Branch.

The Art Gallery moved into separate quarters at 1145 Georgia Street in the early 1930s (see also here). In 1983, it moved to its present location at the site of the second court house.

If the board of the Art Gallery gets its way, the gallery will move within the next decade or so to yet another location – the former site of Cambie Street Grounds; today the grounds are a City parking block.

CVA 677-711.2 - City Museum, Art Gallery and Library, Vancouver, B.C. 1932 PT Timms.

CVA 677-711.2 – City Museum, Art Gallery and Library, Vancouver, B.C. 1932 PT Timms.

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Stanley in Winter

CVA 586-123 - Two skiers looking at a view of Point Grey and Stanley Park from the top of Mt. Seymour, B.C. 1940 Don Coltman photo.

CVA 586-123 – Two skiers looking at a view of Point Grey and Stanley Park from the top of Mt. Seymour, B.C. 1940 Don Coltman photo.

This slideshow is a compilation by me of some of the best winter scenes of Stanley Park in the holdings of the City of Vancouver Archives.

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A 1977 View from Harbour Centre

CVA - 2010-006.358 - Looking S.E. to Central Park from Harbour House Sept 1977 Ernie Reksten photo.

CVA – 2010-006.358 – Looking S.E. to Central Park from Harbour House Sept 1977 Ernie Reksten photo.

This is a very different view from the comparable one you would see today from atop Vancouver’s Harbour Centre. This image appears to have been made a few months after the building opened in June, 1977. The sprawling downtown Woodward’s department store complex has, of course, been replaced by the Woodward’s condo development. And the industrial buildings located just east of the Sun Tower is where International Village is today.

The clump of trees on the top border of the photo is one constant. It is Burnaby’s Central Park (with the iconic Telus structure – what is now known as Telus’ Brian Canfield Centre at 3337 Kingsway – silhouetted in front of the trees).

“Harbour House” (mentioned in the City of Vancouver archives notes accompanying the image) was the original restaurant in Harbour Centre (today it is the Top of Vancouver).

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Need Chicks for Your Backyard? Get ‘Em This Week at Woodward’s!

CVA 99-4720 - [Brooding cages in] Woodward's store basement 1935 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-4720 – [Brooding cages in] Woodward’s store basement 1935 Stuart Thomson photo.

This stack of brooding cages full of young chicks was apparently in the basement of Woodward’s Department Store in East Vancouver. My suspicion is that these chicks were sold to the only-partially-urbanized residents of Vancouver, some of whom kept a couple of chickens in their backyards. I have a friend who was born (in the early 1940s) and raised in Vancouver who has said he remembers a neighbour keeping live chickens in her backyard, so this is not far-fetched (although, I admit, it seems so).

Posted in birds, department stores, stuart thomson | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

“All Kinds of Weather, We Stick Together…”*

CVA 180-4274.3 - Yokohama Mayor I. Asukata in 1969 P.N.E. Opening Day Parade.

CVA 180-4274.3 – Yokohama Mayor I. Asukata in 1969 P.N.E. Opening Day Parade.

The “Lord Mayor” of Yokohama in 1969 is pictured here riding in what appears to be a North American car travelling on Burrard Street just north of Georgia Street. Vancouver and Yokohama seem to have been honouring the twinning of the Canadian and Japanese cities a couple of years earlier (in 1965). The 50th anniversary of this relationship is celebrated here.

*The title of this post is borrowed from the Irving Berlin song, “Sisters”, performed in the movie, White Christmas.

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The Robert Marrion Family

CVA - Be P125 - Greer's Beach. 1897. [at the foot of Yew Street] 1897.

CVA – Be P125 – Greer’s Beach. 1897. [at the foot of Yew Street] 1897.

I find the photograph above to be a very charming early Vancouver vignette. It was made, according to City of Vancouver archivists, in 1897 at Greer’s Beach – which today is known as Kitsilano Beach – and shows (among others) Mr. and Mrs. Robert Marrion and their kids.

Robert Marrion was appointed as the City’s health inspector a couple of years prior to this image being made. He was, before that time, a master plumber. His reputation among the staff that grew around him over the years evidently was positive, witness the corporately self-congratulatory 1912 photographic assembly of the lot of them which appears below. (Salus Generis Humani, by the way, translates as “Salvation of the Human Race”!) Mr. Marrion’s reputation was not as great among the Chinese population of Vancouver, where he was known for enforcing health laws in a manner that today would be considered racially discriminatory. John McLaren and others have correctly pointed out, however, that Marrion was a product of his time (as are you and I in ways we cannot begin to imagine).

CVA - LP 344 - [Vancouver Health Department] Salus Generis Humani 1912 Western Photo Studio.

CVA – LP 344 – [Vancouver Health Department] Salus Generis Humani 1912 Western Photo Studio.

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An All But Unknown Burrard Street

CVA 586-2115 - Victory Loan parade [on Burrard Street] 1942 Don Coltman photo.

CVA 586-2115 – Victory Loan parade [on Burrard Street] 1942 Don Coltman photo.

This is a northward view along Burrard Street from near Melville Street (the street that today is adjacent to the Burrard St. Skytrain Station). The most striking aspect of this image to me is that the only building I recognize is the Marine Building.

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‘Geeks’ of the ’40s

CVA 1184-2331 - [Vancouver Chess Club tournament] 1948? Jack Lindsay photo.

CVA 1184-2331 – [Vancouver Chess Club tournament] 1948? Jack Lindsay photo.

These gents (I don’t see any women, do you?) were evidently having a mid-tourney smoke break at the time Jack Lindsay captured this moment. I imagine that the location was at the club headquarters of the Vancouver Chess Club at the former Scottish baronial-style building that was the flagship of the Bank of Montreal (but by this time, had become the Imperial Bank). The club HQ was at 675 Dunsmuir*, which would put it just up the street from Granville (and from the bank, proper), but likely still within the bank building. Today, this is neither a bank property nor a chess club; it is a Shopper’s Drug Mart.

CVA 447-333 - Imperial Bank [of Canada - 586 Granville St.] - Formerly flagship of Bank of Montreal - 1955. W. E. Frost photo.

CVA 447-333 – Imperial Bank [of Canada – 586 Granville St.] – Formerly flagship of Bank of Montreal – 1955. W. E. Frost photo. Note: From 1957, the baronial building would come down to make way for the current structure on this corner (a modernist CIBC structure, now a Shopper’s Drug Mart).

Notes

*Before the Royal Bank’s temple tower replaced the Hadden Building at the corner of Granville & Hastings, the Chess Club was located there (Suite 9, 633 West Hastings) for several years.

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A Man of Influence from UBC

Group photograph of students at Fairview campus of UBC. (Left to right: Jack Clyne, Alan Hunter, Norman Robertson, Ab Richards, Bob Hunter, Keith Shaw). University of British Columbia. Archives.

Group photograph of students at Fairview campus of UBC. (Left to right: Jack Clyne, Alan Hunter, Norman Robertson, Ab Richards, Bob Hunter, Keith Shaw). ca 1922. University of British Columbia. Archives.

The undergraduate pictured third from the left in the UBC photo above would become an Ottawa ‘mandarin’ within a few years of the date this exposure was made. In 1929, Norman Robertson joined the Department of External Affairs in Ottawa, and by 1941 he was appointed to the highest post within that department: Undersecretary of State for External Affairs. In the intervening years, Robertson was a student at Oxford as a Rhodes scholar, and later at the Brookings Institute in Washington, D.C.

Robertson was the recipient, in absentia, of an honorary doctorate from UBC on October 31, 1945. The UBC Senate regretted that “duty in England” prevented him from being present in person to receive the degree. I’m not sure what were the specifics of this duty, but we know that Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King was in England for much of October and that Robertson accompanied him. This visit included, no doubt, post-war meetings; another subject of the visit, likely, was the then-secret Igor Gouzenko defection, which happened around this time (although it wasn’t made public until February 1946).

Vincent Massy with Norman Robertson during visit to UBC campus 195- . University of British Columbia. Archives.

Governor-General Vincent Massey with Canadian High Commissioner to England Norman Robertson (right) at London Airport. ca1952-57 . University of British Columbia. Archives.

Judging from the caption on a duplicate of the image above in a profile of Robertson (in a 1956 issue of Alumni Chronicle), Robertson was greeting Governor-General Vincent Massey (1952-59) upon his arrival for a visit to London, England, presumably during Robertson’s second appointment as Canada’s High Commissioner there (first appointment, 1946-49; second, 1952-57).

A couple of excellent sources of information on Norman Robertson and his Ottawa mandarin colleagues are:

The Ottawa Men: The Civil Service Mandarins 1935-1957 by J. L. Granatstein.

and

• A Man of Influence: Norman A. Robertson and Canadian Statecraft 1929-68 by J. L. Granatstein.

Note: Robertson’s father, Lemuel Robertson, was Professor and the first Chair of the Classics department at UBC. He appears in the group portrait shown below.

port-p1688-presentation-ceremony-to-j-m-chappell-esq-chairman-point-grey-board-of-school-trustees-1915

CVA Port P1688 – Point Grey Board of School Trustees. 1915. Lemuel Robertson is in front row far left (with his and Norman’s characteristic bald pate).

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‘Tame’ Big Band

CVA 1184-1710 - [Poster advertising the Wayne King Show on radio station C.K.W.X. presented by the B.A. Oil Company dealers] 1940-48 Jack Lindsay photo. Note: This is a cropped version of the original photo (by the author).

CVA 1184-1710 – [Poster advertising the Wayne King Show on radio station C.K.W.X. presented by the B.A. Oil Company dealers] 1940-48 Jack Lindsay photo. Note: This is a cropped version of the original photo (by the author).

I have been a big fan of the ‘big band’ music genre for many years (when friends were wild about KISS in the 1970s, I was nuts for Benny Goodman), but Wayne King was not a band leader with whose work I was familiar. In fact, he was so unknown to me that when I first saw this image, I assumed that King was a local broadcaster on Vancouver’s CKWX radio. Nope. He was an American bandleader who recorded his broadcasts in the U.S. by electrical transcription. King’s musical stylings (he became popularly known as “the waltz king” were a little too tame for me; his sound was similar to that of Guy Lombardo’s. If you are curious, there are several tunes of King’s available for listening or free download at archive.org.

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Fur Vault

CVA 1184-2244 - [Man with fur coat entering the fur storage vault at Nelsons Laundry] 1940-48 Jack Lindsay photo.

CVA 1184-2244 – [Man with fur coat entering the fur storage vault at Nelsons Laundry] 1940-48 Jack Lindsay photo.

The first and second image in this post were apparently commissioned by Nelson’s Laundry to local pro photographer Jack Lindsay to demonstrate the secure fur coat storage service offered by the launderer. It is difficult to recall/conceive in this day when fur coats have experienced a real ‘crash’ in public esteem (for good reasons) that at one time they were greatly valued and cared for, in some cases at very significant cost. Nelson’s Laundry was located on Cambie Street at 7th Avenue, where today there is a Save-On-Foods grocery store.

CVA 1184-2243 - [Woman in fur storage vault at Nelsons Laundry] 1940-48 Jack Lindsay photo.

CVA 1184-2243 – [Woman in fur storage vault at Nelsons Laundry] 1940-48 Jack Lindsay photo.

CVA 99-4978 - Nelson Laundry [2300] Cambie Street 1936 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-4978 – Nelson Laundry [2300] Cambie Street 1936 Stuart Thomson photo.

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China Creek Cycle Oval

CVA - 2010-006.164 - Vancouver - Bike Oval 1956 EH Reksten photo.

CVA – 2010-006.164 – Vancouver – Bike Oval 1956 EH Reksten photo.

This cycling oval was originally built for the British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Vancouver in 1954. After the Games were over, it became known as China Creek Cycle Oval. The oval seems to have been located just east of where Vancouver Community College (Broadway Campus) has been since 1980. The track cost $115,000 to construct and was made of all wood.

Posted in education, Ernie Reksten, sport, street scenes | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Handsome Garage

CVA 99-4337 - F. Cheeseman's Garage [at 1147] Howe Street 1933 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-4337 – F. Cheeseman’s Garage [at 1147] Howe Street 1933 Stuart Thomson photo.

Ah, these were good days; when architects and automotive dealers/mechanics cared enough to make even a garage appear as though it were a work of art! This was one of two Fred Cheeseman garages in Vancouver at this time. This one was located roughly where the Cinamateque is today.

CVA 99-4336 - F. Cheeseman's Garage [at 1147] Howe Street 1933 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-4336 – F. Cheeseman’s Garage [at 1147] Howe Street 1933 Stuart Thomson photo.

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City of Vancouver Engineering Works, 1945

CVA 586-4132 - Vancouver Engineering Works [interior of shop] 1945 Don Coltman photo.

CVA 586-4132 – Vancouver Engineering Works [interior of shop] 1945 Don Coltman photo.

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Neilson’s Chocolate – Almost Makes Being Ill Seem Like a Treat

CVA 99-72 - Burns Drug Store [732 Granville Street] [exterior view of window display] ca 1920 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-72 – Burns Drug Store [732 Granville Street] [exterior view of window display] ca 1920 Stuart Thomson photo.

The sweetest drug of all – chocolate – brought to you by Neilson’s at Burn’s Drugs Co. Burns Drugs was in a building adjacent to the Vancouver Block (sharing space in 1920 with West End Nurseries). Neilson’s is a Canadian dairy success story.

Posted in businesses, cafes/restaurants/eateries, street scenes, stuart thomson | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Photographers of the Pacific Northwest in Vancouver

CVA - PAN N174A - Seventeenth Annual Convention of the P.A. of P.N.W. Vancouver B.C. Aug 2 to 5, 1921 [Photographers Association of the Pacific Northwest] 1921 WJ Moore photo.

CVA – PAN N174A – Seventeenth Annual Convention of the P.A. of P.N.W. Vancouver B.C. Aug 2 to 5, 1921 [Photographers Association of the Pacific Northwest] 1921 WJ Moore photo.

With panorama images of this sort (of which W J Moore was an acknowledged local professional specialist), I like to use the magnifying icon to inspect individual faces and speculate on what each person may have been thinking at the time the exposure was made. As an amateur photographer myself, I have perhaps a bit of insider knowledge as to what some of the thoughts might have been that were going through the heads of a few of these amateurs and pros:

Screen Shot 2015-09-12 at 4.24.50 AM

Skeptic: Does this Moore chap really know WHAT he’s doing?

Screen Shot 2015-09-12 at 4.21.48 AM

Impatient: Come ALONG, Moore! Today, please, while we still have SUNLIGHT!

Alright, I've removed my hat, as you've asked. I could have made the image work without asking one of my models to remove his hat... but plainly you are just learning your craft, so I'll indulge you!

Super-ego: Alright, I’ve removed my hat, as you’ve INSISTED. I could have made the image work WITHOUT asking one of my models to remove his chapeau… but plainly you’re just LEARNING the craft, so I’ll indulge you!

Screen Shot 2015-09-12 at 4.19.33 AM

Shy: Mr. Moore surely will not be able to spot me behind this coniferous limb. If I remain perfectly still and quiet back here, I’m SURE I’ll go unnoticed.

Posted in people, Photographers, W J Moore | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Which of These Things Doesn’t Belong (Today)?

CVA - 2008-022.077 - View of reception area of Vancouver General Hospital's Centennial Pavilion 1959 LF Sheraton photo.

CVA – 2008-022.077 – View of reception area of Vancouver General Hospital’s Centennial Pavilion 1959 LF Sheraton photo.

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1960s Camera Shop Interior

The images below show a couple of interior views of an unnamed camera shop taken (it is estimated by the City of Vancouver Archives) sometime in the 1960s. I wondered if these were early shots of Leo’s Camera Supply on Granville near Nelson. It has certainly been around long enough, having recently celebrated 60 years in business (August 2015). The counters in the images also appear to me to be similar to the counters at Leo’s; however, I suspect that such fixtures were de rigeur for any serious camera shop of the time.

In a bio note in CVA’s online records, they indicate that the photographer of these images, Leslie F. Sheraton, “was co-owner of a photographic supply shop in Vancouver.” Whether the shop was Leo’s or some other shop, is not stated. But it seems likely that these images were made in the retail outlet co-owned by Sheraton.

CVA - 2008-022.038 - [Interior of camera store] 196- LF Sheraton photo.

CVA – 2008-022.038 – [Interior of camera store] 196- LF Sheraton photo.

CVA - 2008-022.039 - [Interior of camera store] 196- LF Sheraton photo.

CVA – 2008-022.039 – [Interior of camera store] 196- LF Sheraton photo.

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Gift of the Gods

CVA - 2008-022.130 - PNE Parade, on East Hastings and Jackson, Gift of Gods float and spectators 196- L F Sheraton photo.

CVA – 2008-022.130 – PNE Parade, on East Hastings and Jackson, Gift of Gods float and spectators 196- L F Sheraton photo.

This image of a PNE float is, in my judgement, one of the most outrageous of those I have seen. It was a bit of a puzzle, at first, as to just what was being advertised. The central figure – a young woman – was raised above the float level with lightning bolts apparently radiating from her throne. The text on the float’s front reads “Gift of the Gods” and another piece of text seems to read “Power in Pardise”.

The clue to the origin of the float is the word “Wenatchee” – which appears on the side of the float. Wenatchee, of course, is a community in Washington State. This led me to speculate that the float was from the Pacific Northwest. It seems that the float was a celebration of the Washington State Apple Blossom Festival. For a more modest float photographed as part of the Daffodil Festival in Tacoma in 1976, see here.

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NOT Teeny-Boppers

CVA - 2008-022.145 - PNE Parade, on East Hastings and Jackson, women on Chevrolet automobile 196- L F Sheraton photo.

CVA – 2008-022.145 – PNE Parade, on East Hastings and Jackson, women on Chevrolet automobile 196- L F Sheraton photo.

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27,000 Miles Through Space!

CVA 180-7619 - Cablevision converter display booth (PNE) 1978 Bob Tipple photo.

CVA 180-7619 – Cablevision converter display booth (PNE) 1978 Bob Tipple photo.

The programming available in 1978 from Jerold Cable Converters seems uninspiring, but perhaps that’s just me. Maybe there was more of an audience at that time for House of Commons TV, the CBC Northern Service (in both official languages, no less), and no fewer than three channels of American old-time-religion (delivered through new-fangled media): Pat Robertson’s Christian Broadcasting Network, Paul Crouch’s Trinity Broadcasting Network, and Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker’s PTL service.

According to Blue Skies: A History of Cable Television, by Patrick Parsons, ‘Fanfare’ was a regional sports provider that would be swallowed in 1979 by Showtime to become Showtime Plus (p396).

The ‘Grand Prize’ cabinet TV appears to be perched pretty precariously atop this PNE booth!

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Forgotten Chinatown Playground

CVA 1477-69 - [Mayor L.D. Taylor with children and unidentified man at opening of children's playground at Carrall and Pender streets] 1928.

Photo A: CVA 1477-69 – [Mayor L.D. Taylor with children and unidentified man at opening of children’s playground at Carrall and Pender streets] 1928.

The newly-opened playground (in 1928) which is shown in Photos A and B was, according to CVA’s notes, somewhere near the intersection of Carrall and Pender Streets in Chinatown. But where exactly the playground was located is a bit of a mystery. Most of the lots at the intersection would have been developed for some time by 1928: the Sam Kee building (aka Jack Chow Insurance) on the SW corner has been there since 1913; the Chinese Freemasons Building (aka the Peking Chop Suey House) across the street from Sam Kee has been there even longer, since 1907; the Chinese Times Building on the NE corner (temporary home to Jack Chow Insurance while the Sam Kee block is undergoing renovations) has been on the site since 1902; the only lot that seems a likely site for this playground is the SE corner, where the Sun Yat Sen Gardens were built in 1986.

There are no CVA or VPL photos that I could find of the garden site before it became SYSG. But there are a couple of clues that tend to confirm my conclusion that the playground was on the site of what ultimately became SYSG.

First clue: The building in Photo B behind Mayor Taylor and the two Chinese gents appears to my eye to be very like the building in Photo C at left and marked “1904” (although without the awnings in Photo C). This structure would have been behind the men if they were facing east and standing roughly where SYSG is today.

Second clue: In Photo D, the men were standing on a platform. Behind them is what looks a lot like the Georgia Viaduct (No.1). The Viaduct would be visible south of the site of SYSG.

Item - CVA 1477-68 - [Mayor L.D. Taylor at opening of children's playground at Carrall and Pender streets] 1928.

Photo B:  CVA 1477-68 – [Mayor L.D. Taylor at opening of children’s playground at Carrall and Pender streets] 1928.

CVA 677-581 - [Looking north towards Pender Street along the west side of the 500 block of Carrall Street] 190- P. T. Timms photo.

Photo C: CVA 677-581 – [Looking north towards Pender Street along the west side of the 500 block of Carrall Street] 190- P. T. Timms photo.

VPL 22689 - Mayor LDT standing on platform of Chinese playground on Carrall & Pender March 24, 1928 Dominion Photo.

Photo D: VPL 22689 – Mayor LDT standing on platform of Chinese playground on Carrall & Pender March 24, 1928 Dominion Photo.

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Richard “The Troll” – Former Rhino Leader – Missed in 2015

rich-the-troll

Richard Schaller, aka “Richard the Troll”, former leader of the Rhinoceros Party of Canada. Credit: CBC.ca

Canadians are in the midst of a tedious federal election campaign with no truly interesting leaders nor stimulating platforms. I for one am missing Richard “The Troll” Schaller, of North Vancouver, the former western caucus chairman of the Rhinoceros Party (their ‘prime directive’: to not fulfill any of their promises), who died of cancer in 2006.

This CBC News clip from the 1988 federal election illustrates The Troll’s lighthearted and comic attitude.

Wouldn’t it make a welcome change if Harper, Trudeau, et. al. could (a) publicly laugh at themselves (without being scripted to do so) and (b) refrain from promptly polling the nation to check whether ‘we’ liked it?

The Rhinos are running candidates in 2015, but sadly not many in the West. Indeed, Parti Rhino seems to be strongest in Quebec – home to the current leader and several of its candidates. Between 1965 and 1988, the Rhinos captured between <1% to 2.4% of the popular vote.

For some of the RP’s ‘platform’, see here. My favourite is #11 (“Ban guns and butter – both kill”); #12 (“Reform Loto-Canada, replacing cash prizes with Senate appointments”) is a little too close to what has become reality in recent years.

Rhinocerous Party logo.

2015 Rhinocerous Party logo.

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Sea of Hats

CVA 99-1015 - Crowd watching soccer game in progress at Cambie Street ground ca1920 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-1015 – Crowd watching soccer game in progress at Cambie Street Grounds ca1920 Stuart Thomson photo. (Note: This version of 99-1015 has been cropped and had the exposure adjusted slightly by me. For the original  state of the image, see CVA online.)

This is a somewhat unusual view of the Cambie Street Recreation Grounds (for some later years, the site of the long-distance bus station, later still – optimistically – dubbed Larwill Park and serving as a City car park with aspirations to become the site of the Vancouver Art Gallery). The image appears to be taken from the SW corner of the block toward the NW corner. The crowd of mainly men was viewing a soccer game. And, remarkably, virtually every head in then crowd is covered. The soccer players were evidently permitted to play bare-headed without social impunity; however, notably, the men in striped jerseys – game officials, I presume – seem to have been be-hatted.

The second site of the YMCA is visible in the distance (near mid-photo, at corner of Dunsmuir and Cambie), as is part of the Sun Tower (right) and Vancouver High School (the school’s prominent tower appears to the left of the photo behind residences).

I won’t pretend to understand fully why hats were such a dominant and lasting feature of men’s and women’s fashion in the 19th and 20th centuries. For extended commentary on men’s hats in earlier years, see here and here, among other sources.

I cannot resist showing another CVA image of an Australian cricket team visiting Vancouver in 1911 (and including the photographer of this image and of the one above, Stuart Thomson, a former Aussie who emigrated to Canada the year before this image was made and who would make his home and career in Vancouver until his death in 1960). Interestingly, a couple of the gents in the photo seem not to have received ‘the memo’ and appeared hatless (gasp!).

…[N]o man wore fewer than one hat, outdoors, regardless of weather. A man’s hat was the status symbol that distinguished the white man from the aborigine, the God-fearing from the heathen, the clad from the unclothed. The hat was something to raise to a lady, to remove in church, and to hang in the home. It had the magic properties of the amulet, warding off evil, shielding the wearer at the most vulnerable part of his anatomy: the crown of his skull. — Eric Nichol, Vancouver

CVA 99-123 - Australian XI [group photo, poss. S. Thomson on right in bowler hat] ca 1911 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-123 – Australian XI [group photo, poss. S. Thomson on right in bowler hat] ca 1911 Stuart Thomson photo.

Facing NW corner of former Cambie Street Grounds. 2015. Author's photo.

Facing NW corner of former Cambie Street Grounds. 2015. Author’s photo.

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Mystery of the Dog in the Manger

CVA - SGN 1586 - [Teacher Dorothy Alison and students in classroom of Model School] 1907? C. Bradbury photo.

CVA – SGN 1586 – [Teacher Dorothy Alison (sic) and students in classroom of Model School] 1907? C. Bradbury photo. Miss Allison (correct spelling) became Mrs Bradbury in December 1907, marrying the photographer of this image, Charles Bradbury.

If you look closely at the blackboard of this image of the Model School (at Cambie and 12th; still standing, although the interior has been altered to make it City Square shopping mall), you can see part of the lesson for the day – a rural tale for these then-semi-rural Vancouver youngsters: that of ‘The Dog in the Manger’. According to the author of this site, this isn’t truly one of the tales of Aesop (of which there are no original written documents); it was added to an early post-printing-press edition produced by German printer Heinrich Steinhowel. The fable has been used (along with others with more verifiable Aesop pedigree) for centuries as a morals booster to improve societal quality (not a morale booster – which is principally concerned with making individuals feel better about themselves – a quite different thing).

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Early Tech for “Readin’, ‘Ritin’ and ‘Rithmetic”

CVA 99-4860 - Clarke and Stuart [Company Limited office at 550 Seymour Street] 1936 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-4860 – Clarke and Stuart [Company Limited office at 550 Seymour Street] 1936 Stuart Thomson photo.

Most of the school supplies in this office building are recognizable to me. The 1930s version of the Remington typewriter, of course (with that almost unheard of technology, carbon paper inserted), variations on early document copiers (which I’m tempted to refer to generally – and, doubtless, inaccurately – as ‘Gestetner machines‘), wooden teacher desks that were ubiquitous in classrooms even when I was a student in primary and secondary schools decades later, globes, and educational posters.

One item which I was unable to immediately name, however, was the machine on which the woman near the centre of the image was working (and whom the balding fellow appears to be admiring). My wife identified this as a sort of early tracing machine which may have been used by art instructors and others for preparing classroom materials.

This office was in the still-standing 3-storey structure (1929?) shown below (far left). Stuart Thomson successfully captured not only the interior of the 1936 tableau, but also part of Clarke and Stuart’s exterior signage (which, if the dating is accurate, was due soon to be replaced with the sign shown in the W. J. Moore photo made one year later) and two of its still-existing across-the-street-building neighbours: — the apparently Georgian-inspired 543 Seymour (which would be CKWX radio’s downtown HQ for years, beginning in the 1940s, I believe; later home to the Canadian Armed Forces; in recent years, home for a series of private colleges and language schools) and the Seymour Building, at 525 Seymour (1920), known in its early years as the Yorkshire block.

Clarke & Stuart Newspaper Advert

James Duff Stuart (note: CVA shows his surname as “Stewart”; a misspelling) and Harold Clarke were the owners of the school supply purveyor shown above. For more about them and their apparently successful Vancouver business interests in several locations, see here and here.

CVA - Str N138 - [View of the 500 Block Seymour Street] 1937 W J Moore photo.

CVA – Str N138 – [View of the 500 Block Seymour Street] 1937 W J Moore photo.

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80 Years

CVA 1376-728 - Granville Street just north of Dunsmuir [Street] 1935 P.T. Timms photo.

CVA 1376-728 – Granville Street just north of Dunsmuir [Street] 1935 P.T. Timms photo.

There are differences that leap to my attention when I consider these two images together. A principal one is how much more clothing we Vancouverites wore 80 years ago as against today (although it must be admitted that the seasons shown are probably not identical). And how de rigeur was the practice of wearing something on one’s head – nearly all of the people in the 1935 image!

While I find the people in both images to be endlessly interesting, the architecture in the 2015 version I find less so.

Looking north on Granville Street between Dunsmuir and Pender Streets. 2015. Author's photo.

Looking north on Granville Street between Dunsmuir and Pender Streets. August 2015. Author’s photo.

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Why a ‘Bailey Bridge’ in Downtown Vancouver, 1944?

CVA 586-3200 - Hotel Vancouver 1944 Don Coltman photo.

CVA 586-3200 – Hotel Vancouver 1944 Don Coltman photo.

I could find out nothing about the above bridge either online or in the local library. The photograph of the bridge (1 of 2 by Don Coltman; the other image is here) shows the structure spanning Georgia Street at one-way, south-bound Howe Street in October 1944. There is no photographic (nor textual) evidence that I’ve been able to find to indicate that there was a bridge at this location except for this image.

Zooming on the image reveals a sign on the structure identifying it as “Bailey Bridge Class #2(? or 7?) Dual Carriageway”. Initially, I assumed that “Bailey” was after a local British Columbian (e.g., Vancouver professional photography pioneer, Charles Bailey). But I’ve since concluded that while Bailey is indeed a surname, it wasn’t for a B.C. resident (rather, for British engineer, Sir Donald Bailey); furthermore, the name of the bridge isn’t a unique identifier, but instead a type of bridge (created by Bailey) which was commonly used during and after WWII in Europe and elsewhere. In short, the Bailey Bridge was a modular means of spanning a water or land gap with a structure that could carry vehicles as large and heavy as tanks. For detailed info on Bailey Bridges, please consult this page.

The Georgia Street crossing was evidently meant to carry both pedestrians and automobile traffic (there is one vehicle visible). However, there seem to be a number of pedestrians who ignored the existence of the bridge and preferred to take their chances crossing Georgia at street level. The lack of buy-in from many pedestrians plus the limited clearance on Georgia (10’6″) imposed by the bridge may have contributed to the bridge’s brief lifespan (especially in post-war Vancouver with increasing industrial traffic travelling on Georgia to and from the North Shore).

But, for now at least, the questions of motive (why it was built and why it stood so briefly) remain unanswered. My wife has suggested that perhaps it was a demonstration bridge. That’s a plausible explanation, but why build it here, over a moderately-busy intersection in a part of the world where there are no lack of water crossings?

If readers of VAIW have any clues/tips (or are aware of other images of this bridge), I’d appreciate hearing from you.

CVA 371-33 - [Military tanks and Jeeps travelling west on Georgia Street in the Diamond Jubilee Parade] 1946.

CVA 371-33 – [Military tanks and Jeeps travelling west on Georgia Street in the Diamond Jubilee Parade] 1946.    (Note: We are looking east on Georgia – the opposite direction in which Don Coltman was facing when he made the initial image featured in this post. The photographer in this image was looking towards where the bridge once was on Howe (just below where the Hotel Georgia sign is on the left). This is to illustrate that certainly, within 2 years or less, the bridge had been removed).

Note: A fascinating article of the contribution of a Canadian to Bailey Bridge variants may be found here: “Kingsmill Bridge in Italy”, by Ken MacLeod.

Posted in architects, bridges/viaducts, Don Coltman, street scenes | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Jubilee Methodist Men in Drag

CVA 99-3535 - Jubilee Men's Musical Revue at Jubilee Methodist Church 1925 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-3535 – Jubilee Men’s Musical Revue at Jubilee Methodist Church 1925 Stuart Thomson photo.

This amusing photo may be one of the final images made (and certainly one of the last professional photos made) at Jubilee Methodist Church in Burnaby before it became Jubilee United Church later in 1925. Jubilee Church was located on Kingsway near Imperial Street. In 1936, Jubilee and the former Henderson Presbyterian Church – which, by then, had become Henderson United Church (at nearby Kingsway and Joyce) – amalgamated to become Henderson-Jubilee United Church; they constructed a new building in 1947 (Twizell & Twizell, of St Andrews-Wesley United Church fame) and became known from then as West Burnaby United Church (which still stands as such).

This ‘musical revue’ may have been a variation on the traditional English pantomime.

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The Grants

Closer view (cropped) o CVA - Port P1396 - [The wedding party of Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Hopcraft at Skunk Cove] - Rev Roland Grant #2 Aug 4 - 1904.

Closer view (cropped) of CVA – Port P1396 – [The wedding party of Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Hopcraft at Skunk Cove]. Aug 4 – 1904.

This wedding party photo is important, in my opinion, for a couple of reasons. It is one of the first records of an outdoor wedding in the Lower Mainland, to the best of my knowledge. And it is the last photograph made in Greater Vancouver, of which I’m aware, of First Baptist Church’s former minister, Rev. Dr. Roland Dwight Grant.

The wedding allegedly took place “beneath a spreading maple tree” in what was then known as Skunk Cove (today, Caulfield, West Vancouver; not far from where Lighthouse Park is today).

The bride (#1) was Annie Evalyn Hopcraft, nee Grant, (although she is sometimes referred to as Nancy); the groom (#4) was Lt. William Dixon Hopcraft (sometimes the surname is spelled Hopcroft, for some reason). W. D. Hopcraft was an officer with the Canadian Pacific Empress transpacific liners. He would go on to command the Empress of Japan.

Rev. Dr. Grant, 1852-1912, (#2) was a Baptist minister who came, originally, from Connecticut and had held pastorates in Boston, New York, New Hampshire, and Oregon. Grant accepted the call of First Baptist Church, Vancouver, in 1900 and resigned from a (temporarily) split church by 1904. Grant seems to have been largely responsible for the split; the short story is that his supporters were the ones who walked out of FBC (including E.B. Morgan who appears in the un-cropped version of the wedding photo below). By early 1906, happily, the divided church was reunited.

CVA - Port P1396 - [The wedding party of Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Hopcraft at Skunk Cove] - Rev Roland Grant #2 Aug 4 - 1904.

CVA – Port P1396 – [The wedding party of Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Hopcraft at Skunk Cove] – Aug 4 – 1904. 1) Mrs [WD] Hopcraft; 2) Rev. Roland Grant; 3) Mrs Hopcraft’s mother; 4) Mr Hopcraft; 5) Orson Banfield; 6) Mr Montilius; 7) Mrs Montilius; 8) Miss Montilius; 9) Mary Banfield; 10) Lois Banfield; 11) Alderman Grant; 12) Mrs. Grant; 13) Mrs Ollie; 14) Miss Grant; 15) Dr A. S. Monro 16) Mrs Monro; 17) E. B. Morgan; 18)Mrs Faulkner; 19) Mr Faulkner; 20) Lilllie Falkner; 21) Mrs Argue; 22) Mr Banfield; Mrs Banfield (at back with arm raised); and others.

Presumably, “Alderman Grant” in the un-cropped version of the photo was a relation of the Roland Grants (he wasn’t Roland’s brother, however; his brother’s name was Alonzo Timothy Grant). It seems likely that he was early Vancouver Alderman Robert Grant, but he is probably not the female person identified in the photo (#11 and #12 seem to have been mistakenly switched and probably should show #11 as Alderman Grant and #12 as Mrs Robert Grant). #3 appears to be correctly – although oddly – identified as Mrs Hopcraft’s mother; she was that, but it would have made more sense (to me, at least) to refer to her either as “Mrs Roland Grant” or (even better) as “Mrs Helen Grant”. The “Miss Grant” identified as #14 (the lass whose hand Rev Grant is holding) is most probably his younger daughter, Berona.

I should note upon conclusion that this probably wasn’t a church crowd; or at least, it wasn’t a predominantly Baptist crowd. Hopcraft is believed to have been of the Anglican persuasion. Although Roland, Helen, and Annie, as well as E. B. Morgan  appear on the membership rolls at FBC, it seems unlikely that this wedding party was dominated by Baptists. Indeed Caulfield’s St. Francis in the Wood church website identifies this wedding (which pre-dates the St. Francis church building being erected in 1927) as having been an Anglican one (although the St Francis site shows the bride, Mrs. Annie Hopcraft, as Mrs. ‘Nancy’ Hopcraft, so I’m not certain of the site’s historical reliability). It isn’t known if Roland participated in officiating in the wedding; but given the size of Rev. Grant’s ego, I would be very surprised if he didn’t play some role!

Posted in churches, First Baptist Church, Vancouver, people | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

PNE Parade on East Hastings

2010-006.167 – Vancouver 1956 PNE Parade, Aug 1956.

The scene above captures well the enthusiasm of PNE Parade spectators at East Hastings and Princess Street in the mid-1950s. There would be parades to kick off the Pacific National Exhibition each year for another 40 years (ending in 1995). The only exception since ’95 has been a parade to mark the 100th anniversary of the PNE in 2010; but that parade was held on Beach Avenue near Stanley Park rather than along the traditional Hastings Street strip.

The Carl Rooms block (which apparently went up in the early years of the Great War, likely 1915) at 575 East Hastings still stands, as does the 4-storey Spokane Rooms two doors east (left) of there, which seems to have been on the block since about 1913. There is still a grocery where B&B Grocery once was; and today, the Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House is where The WashHouse Launderette was in the image. At least a few of the single storey structures east of Spokane Rooms appear to remain: what was in 1956 home to such ‘Mom & Pop’ shops as Sak’s Tailors, a butcher (no baker or candlestick maker, as far as I can tell), an accordion manufacturer/college/musical instrument repair shop, and (of course) a barber shop and lunch counter (Princess Lunch). The dwelling between Carl Rooms and Spokane Rooms has been demolished to make way for the Tung Koon Benevolent Association block.

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Marine Chain Manufacturing

CVA 586-1262 - Welding [for] wartime merchant shipping 1943 Don Coltman photo.

Photo A: CVA 586-1262 – Welding [for] wartime merchant shipping 1943 Don Coltman photo.

My friend, Wes, has knowledge on a wide range of topics – from cars to aircraft to, evidently, welding processes. I asked him today if he had any idea what the manufacturing steps were that were illustrated in these Vancouver wartime images. Today’s post is largely thanks to his smarts.

What is being created in these images is chain for use as anchor cables on war period merchant ships. James Pritchard in A Bridge of Ships: Canadian Shipbuilding During the Second World War (2011) points out that a Canadian crown plant called Wartime Merchant Shipping, Ltd. was set up on Granville Island. The crown corp purchased a chain creation process called “Electro-Weld” from Pacific Chain and Manufacturing Company (Portland, OR) to supply 144 sets of anchor-chain cable. The process at Granville Island was the same as that employed at the American company’s Seattle plant:

  1. Steel bar stock was cut, heated, and formed into chain. Photo A shows the steel being formed into chain.
  2. The support was welded into each link (whether by hand or machine isn’t clear; perhaps it was begun by one process and finished by the other). See Photo B.
  3. The completed length of chain was stretched out for inspection and testing (and some welding was done at this point, presumably to fix missed areas). See Photo C.
  4. Completed chain was heat-treated for strength in an oven (steps 3 and 4 may have been reversed). See Photo D.

CVA 586-1261 - Welding [for] wartime merchant shipping 1943 Don Coltman photo.

Photo B: CVA 586-1261 – Welding [for] wartime merchant shipping 1943 Don Coltman photo.

Photo C. CVA 586-1267 – Chain plant [for] wartime merchant shipping 1943 Don Coltman photo.

Photo D. CVA 586-1279 – Chain plant [for] wartime merchant shipping 1943 Don Coltman photo.

According to Pritchard, the Granville Island plant “was soon turning out 15 fathoms (27.4m) per shift, or fifteen sets of chain per month. The venture was so successful that Canadian-type 10,000-tonners were supplied with a full prewar quantity of 270 fathoms (494m) of anchor cable, which was also exported to the United States.” (p. 233)

If you are interested, this video shows a present-day, more automated chain-production process.

Posted in boats/ships, businesses, Don Coltman | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Unusual Angle on Hotel Vancouver #2

CVA - Van Sc P63.5 - [Looking southeast from Howe Street and Georgia Street] 1929 Leonard J Frank photo.

CVA – Van Sc P63.5 – [Looking southeast from Howe Street and Georgia Street] 1929 Leonard J Frank photo.

This perspective affords us photographic time travellers an atypical angle on the second (and best, in my opinion) of the Hotels Vancouver (Swales, 1916), of its northern neighbour, the York Hotel (Honeyman & Curtis, 1911) – which was demolished in 1968 for Pacific Centre mall – and bits and pieces of several other structures (e.g., the second Vancouver Courthouse (Rattenbury, 1912), which became the Vancouver Art Gallery in 1983 appearing in the bottom right corner of the image). This incarnation of the HV was demolished in 1949 after serving as home for difficult-to-house veterans during and after WWII.

Where was this image made? It was pretty plainly made from the north side of Georgia, likely closer to Hornby Street than to Howe St, most probably from the Medical-Dental Building (McCarter & Nairne) – opened in 1929, the same year as this photo was made, and demolished in 1989. The Devonshire Hotel (also McCarter & Nairne, 1925) – demolished in 1981 (the HSBC bank replaced it on the site) – is really the only other contender for the honour, but it was a relatively shorter structure than the Georgia Hotel (next door and east of the Devonshire) – of which we can spot the near upper corner in the lower left image of the image, meaning that the camera was angled downward relative to the Georgia, and that would have been impossible from the rooftop of the Devonshire. It had to be taken from the relatively taller Georgia Medical-Dental building. For a helpful visual illustration of the differing heights of these buildings, see this image.

The photo also allows us helpful perspective of the rooftop garden of the former Hotel Vancouver. For a couple of nearer views, see here and here.

Posted in architects, hotels/motels/inns, Leonard J. Frank | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pre-Expo ’86 Perspective

CVA 800-3087 - [Shows man on Skytrain line construction] 1983 Al Ingram photo.

CVA 800-3087 – [Shows man on Skytrain line construction] 1983 Al Ingram photo.

The man in the image is standing on what will become Skytrain’s elevated concrete guideway near what will be the Main Street/Science World Station. The worker seems to be looking toward the Pacific Central Station (VIA Rail’s local railway station and the long-distance bus terminal). There are early signs across Main Street (at ground level below the guideway) of construction of what would be known as Expo Centre (Freschi) and which would become Science World in its post-Expo life (Alexander).

It is undeniable that Expo was a major hinge of change (much of it positive) in Vancouver. I’ll touch on just a couple of those changes. One, plainly, is the development of a component to the local public transit system, SkyTrain; this novelty would, gradually, be taken more seriously by Vancouver residents and their political leaders as a real and viable option as a people mover for Greater Vancouver.*

Another change was the early development of a downtown stadium district. BC Place (with its, then, air-inflatable ‘puffy’ roof construction), visible behind the head of the gent in the photo, was opened in 1983 and would be the site of Expo’s opening and closing ceremonies. Notably, before Expo, it would host some of its largest audiences for a couple of Christian gatherings – Pope John Paul II’s ‘Celebration of Life’ visit and a Billy Graham crusade (both in 1984). There is no sign above, of course, of GM Place (which would replace the Pacific Coliseum in 1995 as the main indoor sport stadium, housing the NBA expansion team, Vancouver Grizzlies, and to be home to the NHL franchise, the Canucks. In 2010, GM Place would be re-branded as Rogers Arena.

____

*I was surprised to read, as part of my research for today’s post, about a Vancouver monorail system that was installed as part of Expo ’86 and which in 1987 was moved to the U.K. See here for details. If you are wondering, as was I, what features distinguish monorails from Skytrain and other elevated rail technologies, this site is helpful. This is a very good video showing Expo ’86 buildings, monorail, and gondola.

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Welding Vancouver Streetcar Track

CVA SGN 1068.08 - [Man with generator near man laying streetcar tracks, for reconstruction of Hastings, Main and Harris (Georgia) Street lines] 1912?

CVA SGN 1068.08 – [Man with generator near man laying streetcar tracks, for reconstruction of Hastings, Main and Harris (Georgia) Street lines] 1912?

There was something about the image above that bothered me. Something that didn’t look safe. Then it struck me. The fellow standing next to the wagon with the warning: “Danger: 500 Volts. Do not touch machine or watch flame” had a solid grip on the wagon! I doubt that the welder was actually welding during this photo session, but it appears that the wagon was hooked up to a power source. I suspect that the BC Worker’s Compensation Board, had it been in operation at the time, would have had something to say about this.

I don’t know for certain where this image was made. But if I had to guess, I’d say it was near the trolley car barns (Main and Prior). The streetcar nearby and the quantity of track (both laid and in pieces) led me to that conclusion.

CVA SGN 1068.10 - [Man welding streetcar tracks, for reconstruction of Hastings, Main, and Harris (Georgia) Street lines] 1912? (Note: This seems to be the same welder as in the first image, but taken from his front.)

CVA SGN 1068.10 – [Man welding streetcar tracks, for reconstruction of Hastings, Main, and Harris (Georgia) Street lines] 1912? (Note: This seems to be the same welder as in the first image, but taken from his front.)

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Robson Square Ice Rink Formerly Public W.C.

CVA - Bu P252 - [Entrances to the underground comfort stations on Howe Street near Robson Street] ca 1931 W. J. Moore.

CVA – Bu P252 – [Entrances to the underground comfort stations on Howe Street near Robson Street] ca 1931 W. J. Moore.

If you are a Vancouver resident or have visited the city, you will probably know that these apparently quite handsome public washrooms are no longer here (there are two remaining sets of these relics, neither in the downtown core and both on Hastings Street; one on Hamilton at Victory Square, the other on Main at Carnegie Library. Both of these are exceptionally clean, by the way). If you find yourself in need of public facilities in the heart of downtown, you are restricted to those in nearby hotels/department stores or (if you are adventurous/desperate), the public pod-like WCs that were installed around the time of the Winter Olympic Games.

The photographer of the image above seems to have been standing on Howe Street, just across from where, today, is the parking garage entry to the former Eaton’s/Sears (soon-to-be Nordstrom’s), facing south toward the Robson Street side of Robson Square. Where the W.C. steps descended was, roughly, to where today’s Robson Ice Rink is. The Court House Block (left background) and Clements Block/Alexandria Ball Room (right) – later known as “Danceland” (b&w image below) – were where the grounds and buildings of Vancouver’s Law Courts are today.

For an intriguing history of “comfort stations” or “sanitary conveniences” in early Vancouver, see this article by Margaret W. Andrews.

CVA 784-111 - Robson Square, 800 Robson Street 1986. (Note: In this image, we are facing northwards and looking towards the Robson Square ice rink, rather than facing southwards, as in the prior image).

CVA 784-111 – Robson Square, 800 Robson Street 1986. (Note: In this photo, we are facing northwards and looking towards the Robson Square Ice Rink (beneath the more distant of the two dark domes), rather than facing southwards, as in the prior image).

CVA 447-351 - S.E. Corner Robson and Hornby Sts. 1965 W. E. Frost photo.

CVA 447-351 – S.E. Corner Robson and Hornby Sts. 1965 W. E. Frost photo. For a painting that appears to be based on this image, see Illustrated Vancouver.

Posted in street scenes, W J Moore, W. E. Frost | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Whetham Block/CP Telecom Building

CVA - Str P209 - [View of Cordova Street from the corner of Cambie Street] 1899.

CVA – Str P209 – [View of Cordova Street from the corner of Cambie Street] 1899. (Note: The camera is facing northeast down Cordova; we can confirm this because the Savoy Hotel/Theatre is east and up the block, towards Abbott St, at 135 West Cordova).

The City of Vancouver Archives claims in the Scope and Content section of the record for this photo that it “shows the Wetham Block”. This is a typographical error; it should read “Whetham Block”, named after Dr. James Whetham. There is a biography of Charles Whetham and others in his family (including James) at this site. Note, however, that there appears to be an error in this article pertaining to the Whetham Block. It notes that the Whetham Block was “situated on the North East corner of Cordova and Cambie” (which is correct); but the article then asserts that this building is “still standing” (incorrect). As ‘evidence’ to support this claim, the author shows a Google ‘street view’ image of an early structure on the northwest corner of Cordova at Cambie. (Note: See comment below from Changing Vancouver).

The building on the northeast corner today (175 W Cordova) is the former CNCP Telecom Building (Francis Donaldson, 1969) – today, home to Allstream. The Telecom block was one of the buildings approved as part of Mayor Tom “Terrific” Campbell’s ill-fated “Project 200”. Harold Kalman describes this project as being part of the “sweep-the-old-stuff-away mania of post-WWII urban redevelopment.” (Exploring Vancouver: The Architectural Guide, 2012).

The Canadian Pacific Telecom Building (Francis Donaldson, 1969); today, the Allstream building. 2015. Author's photo.

The CNCP Telecom Building; today, the Allstream building. 2015. Author’s photo.

Posted in people, yesterday & today | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Waterfront Station: Howe Street Entry

CVA 784-082 - Granville Street, 200 Granville Street 1986. (Note: 200 Granville St, in fact, is the tower in the background. This image is of the NE corner of Howe at Cordova).

CVA 784-082 – Granville Street, 200 Granville Street 1986. (Note: 200 Granville St, in fact, is the tower in the background. This image is of the NE corner of Howe at Cordova).

NE corner of Howe and Cordova Streets. The Howe Street entry to Waterfront Station is in the foreground. 2015. Author's photo.

NE corner of Howe and Cordova Streets. The Howe Street entry to Waterfront Station is in the foreground. 2015. Author’s photo.

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The Quadra Club

cva-69-21-05-crosswalk-across-w-georgia-street-on-seymour-street-1972-or-1974-ernie-fladell-photo

CVA 69-21.05 – Crosswalk across W. Georgia Street on Seymour Street. 1972 or 1974. Ernie Fladell photo.

I like this image. It shows a Seymour Street that has largely disappeared. It also shows (just barely) a sign of one of Vancouver’s enduring clubs that had a couple of locations before this address (724 Seymour). I’m referring to the Quadra Club – the sign for which is visible on the left midway up the image (vertical orientation).

The Quadra seems to have been started in about 1925 at 901 West Hastings (where the little green space is, just east of the Vancouver Club, today). By the 1930s it had moved up West Hastings a block to 1021 West Hastings (adjacent to the the 1930-completed Marine Building). Harold Kalman (in Exploring Vancouver: The Architectural Guide, 2012) describes this building as being of Spanish Colonial Revival design (Sharp and Thompson, 1929). By the 1940s, the Quadra Club had moved into its Seymour address. I’m not sure when the Quadra eventually went belly up, but it seems to have ceased operation by the ’60s. There are references on the website of guitarist, Howie James to “resurrecting the old Quadra Club in Vancouver” in the ’60s and ’70s . This isn’t strictly so, however, as the Quadra which he claims to have had a role in reviving was not the Quadra Club, but the Quadra Cabaret (shown below). The Cabaret was in Yaletown on Homer near Nelson.

For more about the Quadra (and its successors), see comments below.

vpl 24915 Quadra Club dining room interior 1939 Dominion Photo

VPL 24915. Quadra Club dining room interior. 1939 Dominion Photo. At its second location adjacent to Marine Building.

CVA 779-E08.30 - 1055 Homer Street 1981.

CVA 779-E08.30 – 1055 Homer Street 1981. Quadra Cabaret.

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Wooden Sidewalk, 1914

CVA 789-64 - 16th Avenue 1914.

CVA 789-64 – 16th Avenue 1914.

This wooden sidewalk was, according to the City of Vancouver Archives, somewhere on 16th Avenue in 1914. Where this was on 16th, I don’t know. It might have been almost anywhere — from Collingwood Street (in Dunbar/Point Grey) in the west to Main Street (Mount Pleasant area) in the east.

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Brutalism on Broadway

CVA 800-1964 - [Description in Progress] Al Ingram photo

CVA 800-1964 – [City of Vancouver Archives Description in Progress] Al Ingram photo.

I have mentioned this building elsewhere in VAIW, but was prompted to show it again this morning upon seeing that this image hasn’t been identified by CVA. It is Broadway Centre (1974) at 805 West Broadway, a fine example of Brutalist architecture. Another example of Vancouver brutalism is the MacMillan-Bloedel building (1965) on Georgia Street. And I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention University Hall at the University of Lethbridge (1971) – see images below – and the current Vancouver Law Courts building (1980). Mac-Blo, University Hall, and Vancouver Law Courts were all designed by Arthur Erickson. U of L and the Law Courts are examples of brutalism turned ‘on its side’, with a predominant horizontal orientation rather than the more typical vertical one.

University of Lethbridge Library Archives Collection. Exterior image of University Hall sraddling the coulees on the west side of Lethbridge, AB:  campusdev-70.

University of Lethbridge Library Archives Collection. Exterior image of University Hall straddling the coulees on the west side of Lethbridge, AB (around the time construction was finished).

University of Lethbridge Library Archives Collection. Interior image of University Hall: 1972_2.

University of Lethbridge Library Archives Collection. Interior image of University Hall.

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When the Subject was Not Human

CVA 586-4770 - Home of Mrs. C.J. McIntosh - 470 West 17th [Avenue] 1946 Don Coltman photo

CVA 586-4770 – Home of Mrs. C.J. McIntosh – 470 West 17th [Avenue] 1946 Don Coltman photo

Although one might be tempted to identify the humans in this photograph as the principal subjects, I don’t think that is the case. It seems more likely to me that the prime subject of this image is the huge living room window letting in a lot of sunlight – atypically for Vancouver! The ladies are not posed to show off their faces nor for comfortable conversation. They appear, rather, to have been positioned to prevent their shadows from unduly messing with the incoming light. I think I would have liked this image better if it had consisted of just the lady on the left (see my cropped version below). It would be a little less awkward and almost arty!

Cropped version of CVA 586-477.

Cropped version of CVA 586-477.

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Georgia Through a Windscreen. . . Dimly

CVA – 2010-006.108 – Grey Cup Decorations Nov 1963 Ernie H. Reksten photo.

The image above seems to have been made through the windscreen of a vehicle that was stopped on Georgia St. for a red light. (Not, in 1963, we may safely assume, taken with the driver’s mobile phone!) It appears to have been shot eastwards from where Bute St. intersects Georgia, probably near dusk (the sun would set behind the driver-photographer’s vehicle).

Much has changed along Georgia. No longer is there a Volkswagen Service centre on the south side of the street, nor is the Shell Oil building on the north side. Today, Coastal Church is the occupant of the former Scientology structure (right foreground); and the Shangri-La today towers over this section of Georgia.

The Grey Cup decorations referred to in the City of Vancouver Archives description seem to have been the large red banners with a Lion Rampant portrayed on one side and ‘B.C’ appearing vertically on the other side. The other team playing in the football game was acknowledged only with the small circular sign affixed to the light pole in the right foreground: “Welcome TiCats”. This referred to the ultimate winners of the 51st Grey Cup, the Hamilton (Ontario) Tiger Cats.

Notably, this was the first CFL championship to include the Lions. The headline on the “Extra” edition of the Vancouver Sun, describing local reaction to the game’s outcome, was “NUTS!”

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B. C. Equipment Company

CVA 99-4677 - Basement of B.C. Equipment [at 551 Howe Street] 1934 Stuart Thomson photo

CVA 99-4677 – Basement of B.C. Equipment [at 551 Howe Street] 1934 Stuart Thomson photo

The image above was the site in 1934 of BC Equipment Company, a heavy equipment/machinery dealer from as early as the 19-teens (although they came into their own, it seems, in the 1930s) until 1985, when its remaining assets were sold. The basement (pictured above) appears to have been the parts department. I’m assuming that the head offices for the white collar types were upstairs. The warehouse, shops and tractor division were on Granville Island after the 1915 reclamation of the Island was finished.

BC Equipment, by the 1960s, had become one of the major dealers in industrial equipment in the province, and it seems that by the mid-1960s, their workers had become organized. The company offered a wide range of products: from pneumatic picks to bulldozers, from cranes to lathes. The 551 Howe property, today, is occupied by a restaurant at street level and the basement appears to have been leased out for storage.

_____
August 12, 2015 Addendum:

I have today noticed, in a history of Granville Island, this interesting quote pertaining to the post-1915 reclamation of the Island: “B.C. Equipment Ltd. built a wood-framed machine shop, clad in corrugated tin, at the Island’s west end. (Today the same structure houses part of the Granville Island Public Market.)” Below is a 1919 photo of the BC Equipment structure on the Island (along with a couple of other early tenants).

CVA - PAN N97 - [View of Granville Island from atop the north end of the Granville Bridge] 1919 W. J. Moore photo.

CVA – PAN N97 – [View of Granville Island from atop the north end of the Granville Bridge] 1919 W. J. Moore photo. (Note: This is a crop of the original WJ Moore panorama. The bridge at the right of this image is the now-gone rail viaduct crossing of False Creek, situated just east of where the Burrard Bridge would eventually be built).

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Pollard’s Lilliputian Opera Company in Vancouver

CVA - Port P1375 - [The Pollard Liliputian Opera Company on the steps of the Badminton Hotel] ca 1905 R. H. Trueman photo

CVA – Port P1375 – The Pollard Lilliputian Opera Company on the steps of Vancouver’s Badminton Hotel, ca 1905. R. H. Trueman photo.

The troupe appearing above was one of the touring groups of the Australian theatre troupe known as Pollard’s Lilliputian Opera Company. The company was made up of actors under 14 years of age, and most of them were female. They specialized in offering comic/light operas (what are often called, today, operettas). I could find no documented indication of what production they offered in Vancouver in 1905. But a theatre listing in Nebraska at roughly the same time showed the group staging Romeo and Juliet. The man in about the third row, right appears to be Tom Pollard, the well-respected leader of the group.

The troupe was posed in front of the Badminton Hotel (southwest corner Howe and Dunsmuir). The image below shows what the interior of the Vancouver Opera House (adjacent to Hotel Vancouver #2 on Granville Street) might have looked like around the time that Pollard’s Lilliputians were in town.

CVA - Bu P7 - [Interior of the Vancouver Opera House - 733 Granville St.] ca 1891 (Note: The original image at CVA has been modified here by cropping out tears and missing parts of original image as well as making the yellowed original into a b/w image).

CVA – Bu P7 – [Interior of the Vancouver Opera House – 733 Granville St.] ca 1891 (Note: The original image at CVA has been modified here by cropping out tears and missing parts of original image as well as making the yellowed original into a b/w image).

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First Avenue Viaduct

CVA - M-13-36 - First Avenue Viaduct - Dominion Construction Company Limited, Contractors 1937 Stuart Thomson photo

CVA – M-13-36 – First Avenue Viaduct – Dominion Construction Company Limited, Contractors 1937 Stuart Thomson photo

The very small grade change associated with the bridge once known widely as the First Avenue Viaduct contributes to its near-invisibility to the modern eye. The principal function of the pre-WWII viaduct was to allow motor traffic to travel over the rail yards in the false creek flats basin, thereby gaining swifter access to the Grandview/Commercial Drive communities. Unlike its nearby cousin, the current Georgia/Dunsmuir Viaduct, this bridge has not had to struggle with negative public relations associated with motives behind its birth. Instead, it has been apparently completely accepted by the general Vancouver public as a near-‘natural’ part of our urban landscape. High praise, indeed, for any bridge.

Today's First Avenue Viaduct viewed from below it, looking upwards and to the northeast (from near the entry to the Home Depot store). 2015. Author's photo.

Today’s First Avenue Viaduct viewed from below it, looking upwards and to the northeast (from near the entry to the Home Depot store). 2015. Author’s photo.

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Granville at 37th Avenue (120 Years Makes a Difference)

CVA - Str P16 - [Horse-drawn wagons on North Arm Road (Granville Street) through the forest (near 37th Avenue)] 1895

CVA – Str P16 – [Horse-drawn wagons on North Arm Road (Granville Street) through the forest (near 37th Avenue)] 1895

Facing south on Granville Street near 37th Avenue. 2015. Author's photo.

Facing south on Granville Street near 37th Avenue. 2015. Author’s photo.

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Pierre Berton (1920-2004) at UBC

UBC Historical Photo Collection Pierre Berton at typewriter.  Reproduced from 1941 Totem Yearbook.

UBC Historical Photo Collection Pierre Berton at typewriter. Reproduced from 1941 Totem Yearbook.

UBC Historical Photo Collection  Pierre Berton sits at typewriter at the Great Trekker dinner 1990 Larry Scherban photo

UBC Historical Photo Collection Pierre Berton sits at typewriter at the Great Trekker dinner 1990 Larry Scherban photo

For a pretty good summation of Berton’s life and accomplishments, see this CBC television news broadcast on the occasion of his death.

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J. H. Carlisle: A Man of Firsts

CVA - Port P193 - [Fire Chief John Howe Carlisle awarded the 'Good Citizen' medal by the Native Sons of B.C.] 1922 Stuart Thomson

CVA – Port P193 – [Fire Chief John Howe Carlisle awarded the ‘Good Citizen’ medal by the Native Sons of B.C.] 1922 Stuart Thomson. (Note: The lady holding the bouquet and standing next to JHC is almost certainly his wife, Laura Carlisle).

J. H. Carlisle (1857-1941) accomplished several “firsts”. He was the first Sunday School Superintendent of First Baptist Church (FBC), before it was formally organized; his name was the first listed among the charter members of FBC when the church was organized; he was the first clerk of FBC; he was the first person honoured with the Good Citizen medal (in 1922), see photo above; and he was the first BC resident to be honoured with the King’s Police Medal (in 1923), see photo below.

Ironically, the “first” attributed to JHC most often – ‘first Vancouver Fire Chief’ – actually wasn’t. That honour went to Samuel Pedgrift (1886); he was followed by J. Blair (briefly); JHC became chief after Blair in the autumn of 1886 until 1888 (Carlisle’s term as chief began after the Great Fire of June 1886). Wilson McKinnon followed JHC’s initial 2-year term. But then Carlisle became chief again — this time for a period unmatched by any chief since: 39 years (1899-1928).

Chuck Davis’ website notes that in 1911 the VFD was ranked by a committee of international experts as among “the world’s best in efficiency and equipment”; and in 1917, it became Canada’s first completely motorized department.

Appropriately, the city’s first fireboat was named in honour of the man: the J. H. Carlisle.

For a photograph of JHC as a relatively young man, see the image and post here.

CVA - Port P140 - [Former Fire Chief J.H. Carlisle after receiving the King's Police Medal from His Honour W.C. Nichol, Lieutenant governor of B.C.] April 1923 Stuart Thomson photo

CVA – Port P140 – [Former Fire Chief J.H. Carlisle after receiving the King’s Police Medal from His Honour W.C. Nichol, Lieutenant governor of B.C.] April 1923 Stuart Thomson photo. (Again, Laura Carlisle, JHC’s wife, is the lady standing next to the chief).

CVA 99-1709 - %22J.H. Carlisle%22 fireboat test run 1928 Stuart Thomson photo. (Note- Carlisle the man is standing amidships upon Carlisle the fireboat)

CVA 99-1709 – “J.H. Carlisle” fireboat test run 1928 Stuart Thomson photo. (Note- Carlisle the man is standing amidships upon Carlisle the fireboat).

J H Carlisle

Chief J. H. Carlisle in younger days. From: Souvenir of the Vancouver Fire Department, 1901. 0024_Page 18_L. University of British Columbia Library. Rare Books and Special Collections. Published by Evans & Hastings for Firemen’s Benefit Association (Vancouver, BC). Photographer unknown.

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. . . It’s a Doozy!

CVA 99 - 3287 - Auto Wreck at [the] 1300 Block, W[est] Pender St[reet] 1920 Stuart Thomson photo

CVA 99 – 3287 – Auto Wreck at [the] 1300 Block, W[est] Pender St[reet] 1920 Stuart Thomson photo

There are no longer any single family dwellings along West Pender Street (according to the BC Directory for 1920, 1325 W. Pender Street was home to Charles V. Ayton), but there is still a substantial elevation change evident below Pender. For comparison, see the next image, made looking up toward Pender from near Hastings Street, one block north of the 1300 block of Pender.

From near the 1300 block of Hastings, looking up the hill towards Pender Street. 2015. Author's photo.

From near the 1300 block of Hastings, looking up the hill towards Pender Street. 2015. Author’s photo.

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Francesco Maracci’s Bluebirds Playing the Lovely. . . Pine Cone Room?

CVA 99-3500 - Ambassador Orchestra - Bluebirds 'using Buescher Instruments' on a drum - 1924 Stuart Thomson photo

CVA 99-3500 – Ambassador Orchestra – Bluebirds ‘using Buescher Instruments’ on a drum – 1924 Stuart Thomson photo

I think that the bandleader pictured above (violinist, centre) is Francesco Maracci, ‘the Venetian virtuoso’ as he was touted in The Oregonian in the early years of the 20th century. Maracci’s Bluebirds was heavily weighted towards woodwinds (saxophones figure prominently in the image).

I don’t know what source led CVA to conclude that the band was called the “Ambassador Orchestra”. I cannot find any Vancouver hotel (or any other institution) in 1924 called “Ambassador” and the band’s name appears (as per normal) on the bass drum. The dominant decorative motif of the room seems to be the humble pine cone (see central light fixture)! So, I think I have identified the band, but as to the location where the image was taken . . . no idea!

(Note: I learned later that there was an Ambassador Hotel in Vancouver, at 773 Seymour (replacing the Hudson Hotel), but that it wasn’t established until about 1939. The Ambassador has since been demolished).

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Scads of Humans Watching the ‘Fly’

CVA - Bu P550 - [Crowd on Beatty Street observing Harry Gardiner (the 'Human Fly' scale the World Tower] 1918 Stuart Thomson photo. (Note: The original image seemed to be to be slightly over-exposed; adjustments have been made to this copy).

CVA – Bu P550 – [Crowd on Beatty Street observing Harry Gardiner (the ‘Human Fly’ scale the World Tower] 1918 Stuart Thomson photo. (Note: The original image seemed to be to be slightly over-exposed; adjustments have been made to this copy).

According to the Vancouver dailies of the time, there were 10,000 people watching as Harry Gardiner, the “human fly”,  climbed the exterior of the World Tower (later, the Sun Tower) without any special climbing equipment, wearing street clothes and his bifocal spectacles. My grandmother would simply have used her multi-purpose word and said that there were, ‘scads’ of people.

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Timeless Reminder

CVA 99-3747 - Canadian Forestry Association - Mayor Malkin and group around car at Pier B-C 1929 Stuart Thomson photo

CVA 99-3747 – Canadian Forestry Association – Mayor Malkin and group around car at Pier B-C 1929 Stuart Thomson photo

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‘My, but you are a wee lass’

CVA 99-2096 - Caledonian Games, Hastings Park  (Note the discus in the hand of the contestant). 1930. Stuart Thomson photo

CVA 99-2096 – Caledonian (aka Scottish) Games, Hastings Park (Note discus in contestant’s hand). 1930. Stuart Thomson photo

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Rectory: Holy Rosary

CVA - CVA 99-4671 - New [unidentified] rectory 1934 (Oct) Stuart Thomson photo. (This rectory is certainly identifiable. It is that of Holy Rosary Cathedral).

CVA 99-4671 – New [unidentified, according to CVA] rectory 1934 (Oct) Stuart Thomson photo. (The rectory is certainly identifiable. It is that of Holy Rosary Roman Catholic Cathedral – see below).

Holy Rosary Cathedral rectory taken from the west side of Richards St. 2015. Author's photo.

Holy Rosary Cathedral rectory taken from the west side of Richards St. 2015. Author’s photo.

CVA 99-2823 - Archbishop Duke, laying of cornerstone of new rectory [ceremony] 1934 Stuart Thomson photo

CVA 99-2823 – Archbishop Duke, laying of cornerstone of new rectory ceremony. 1934. Stuart Thomson photo.

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Ellesmere Rooms

Bu P141 - [Group portrait on porch of the Ellesmere Rooms at 439 Homer Street (Man in derby hat identified as Frank M. Yorke)] ca 1890 Charles S Bailey photo.

CVA – Bu P141 – [Group portrait on porch of the Ellesmere Rooms at 439 Homer Street (Man in derby hat identified as Frank M. Yorke)] ca 1890 Charles S Bailey photo. (Note: One can see how high the boardwalk level has been raised in this early image by comparing where the crowd is standing above with the comparable location in the 1939 photo below. If one  stumbled coming home to Ellesmere in the night after having a little too much ale, it looks as though it was a fall of a number of feet to street level! In 1890, this boarding house was known by its earlier name: Douglas House with Mrs. J. M. Douglas as the proprietress.)

Bu N125 - [Ellesmere Rooms boarding house, northwest corner of Homer Street and Pender Street] 1939 WJ Moore photo.

CVA – Bu N125 – [Ellesmere Rooms boarding house, northwest corner of Homer Street and Pender Street] 1939 WJ Moore photo. (Ellesmere Rooms was described in J. S. Matthews Early Vancouver (Vol. I), 1932 as ” a tall wooden building…which is now used for cheap stores and offices. It was the first large ‘boarding house.'”)

CVA 778-193 - 400 Homer Street west side 1974.

CVA 778-193 – 400 Homer Street west side (Pender to the left; Hastings to the right). 1974.  (By this point, the boarding house had given way, in typical mid-century Vancouver fashion, to a modest-sized parking garage.)

Central City Lodge, NW corner Pender at Homer. 2015. Author's photo.

Central City Lodge, NW corner Pender at Homer. 2015. Author’s photo. (This downtown residential care home was opened at the former Douglas House/Ellesmere Rooms location in 1993).

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Ajello Piano Co. (Canada)

Detail of Str N52.1 - [Stores on the northside of Hastings Street between Cambie and Abbott Streets] 1923 WJ Moore photo.

Detail of Str N52.1 – [Stores on the northside of Hastings Street between Cambie and Abbott Streets] 1923 WJ Moore photo.

Ajello Piano (ca 1910-28) is shown above in its final home (147 W Hastings) in the Astoria Hotel block (which  formerly was adjacent to the Ormidale Block). The Vancouver-based firm should not be confused with Giuliano Ajello & Sons, a piano manufacturing business based in London (UK). The Vancouver business wasn’t a manufacturer; it was a retailer of brands such as Heintzman & Co. pianos. It was the creation of the grandsons of Giuliano: Arthur Giovanni Ajello (1873-1960) and Louis Robert Ajello (1875-1946), who emigrated to Canada in 1910.

The business had various homes over its two decades: 862 Granville (ca1910-13); 957 Granville (ca1914-19); 412 W Hastings (ca1920-22); and 147 W Hastings (ca1923-28).

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Where Was the ‘Overlook’ Subdivision?

Detail of CVA 371-726.2 - [Looking southwest along Cordova Street from Carrall Street] ca 1913.

Detail of CVA 371-726.2 – [Looking southwest along Cordova Street from Carrall Street] ca 1913.

This is a crop of a larger image to clearly show the rooftop sign advertising the subdivision being promoted as “Overlook” by Trites Real Estate. Where, I asked myself, was this ca1913 subdivision located?

Trites Real Estate was owned and operated by Frank Noble Trites (1872-1918). He was from New Brunswick originally and had been in the Vancouver area beginning in 1905. He established a real estate firm operating under his own name until 1909, then as Trites & Leslie, and a few months later as F. N. Trites & Co., Ltd. and finally as Trites, Ltd. (as the firm was known at the time the photo was taken).

An example of one of Trites’ successes is summed up in British Columbia From the Earliest Times to the Present (for which ‘the present’ is 1914): “One such was the sale, in 1909, of the Point Grey lands, owned by the government, a record sale, in which the firm disposed of six hundred and sixty acres for the sum of two million, six hundred and fourteen thousand dollars. At the time the tract was absolutely wild land and the prices  obtained were unheard of for such land. Mr. Trites has always advertised extensively in Canada, the United States and abroad, and during the sale of the Point Grey lands he himself bought property to the value of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars [$250,000]. This land is now subdivided and constitutes one of Vancouver’s most beautiful suburbs, the lots bringing a high figure.” (This expensive-for-its-time property was not, it seems, to have ended up being the Trites’ residence. He moved into what seems to have been his final home in 1912 after apparently unloading his previous one at 779 W 9th/Broadway. Mrs. Trites was still living at their ca1912-purchased home (2385 W 2nd Ave) two years after Mr. Trites died in 1918.

So where was Overlook? I simply don’t know. Trites built a home in the municipality of Point Grey (West 19th at an unknown cross-street), in 1914; he built two other homes on W. 14th Avenue in Vancouver (between Carnarvon and Balaclava) in 1913. I can find no subdivisions named (even provisionally) Overlook at anytime in Vancouver. So, for now, this remains an open question. I’m very open to input from readers of VAIW who have clues as to Outlook’s location.

F. N. Trites died a relatively young man, just a few years after the Overlook image was taken, at age 46. The year of his death (and the fact that there is nothing I can find today showing his involvement in Vancouver real estate from 1915 on) raises flags. But I couldn’t find any evidence that he was a serviceman in WWI. Whether he served, however, in a civilian capacity during the war (he died in Agassiz, oddly ) and subsequently died as a result of that, I’ve not explored.

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Human Traffic Signal

Detail of Str N53.02 - [View of] Hastings St. looking east from S.W. corner of Abbott St. (toward NE corner) 1923 WJ Moore photo.

Detail of Str N53.02 – [View of] Hastings St. looking east from S.W. corner of Abbott St. (toward NE corner) 1923 WJ Moore photo.

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Northwest Seymour & Nelson (1920/’26)

CVA 99 - 3256 - Wrecked Chev[rolet] - Corner Seymour & Nelson ca 1920 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99 – 3256 – Wrecked Chev[rolet] – Corner Seymour & Nelson ca 1920 Stuart Thomson photo.

These two images were taken by the same photographer (Stuart Thomson), the camera is facing the same direction (northwest), and are of nearly the same locations (Seymour Street at Nelson in the first image; Seymour from a bit south of Nelson in the second).

The 1920 image was one of two made by Thomson of an automobile wreck on the corner (the second image looks west down Nelson, toward Granville), possibly for an auto insurance client of Thomson’s. The occurrence of auto accidents was apparently still sufficiently uncommon that it could draw a crowd of pedestrian rubber-kneckers on a miserable day. The 1926 image was made by Thomson for an advertising client, Duker & Shaw Billboards.

It is remarkable, to me, how dramatically this section of Seymour Street had changed in the approximately six years that passed between the creation of the two images. In the 1920 photo, the property on the northwest corner of Seymour and Nelson was a single family dwelling (albeit, one that appears to have been for sale) and the neighbouring properties appear likewise to be family homes. In the 1926 image, Nelson Street crosses Seymour about mid-way up the image. You can just make out the end of the name of the business then located at the northwest corner of Seymour and Nelson: Boultbee Motors. The neighbours of Boultbee appear to be other businesses and the anchor at the end of the block (at southwest corner Seymour at Smithe) is Vancouver Motors (the building in which the Staples stationery store is located today).

For different/later images of Seymour and Nelson, see this post.

CVA 99-2251 - Taken for Duker and Shaw Billboards Ltd. [1000 block Seymour Street between Helmcken and Nelson looking north] ca 1926 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-2251 – Taken for Duker and Shaw Billboards Ltd. [1000 block Seymour Street between Helmcken and Nelson looking north] ca 1926 Stuart Thomson photo.

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Granville at Beach

Str N43 - [Billboards and buildings on the] corner [of] Beach and Granville 1926?  WJ Moore photo.

Str N43 – [Billboards and buildings on the] corner [of] Beach and Granville 1926? WJ Moore photo.

We are looking toward the northeast corner of Granville Street at Beach Avenue in these two images. The first photo (above) was taken slightly to the east of the second (1909) Granville Bridge; the photo below was made a little ways to the east of where the first one was taken – where the Seymour off-ramp of the third (1954) Granville Bridge now is. It is looking at the same lot, however. Today, this lot is one of the very few in downtown Vancouver which is undeveloped. I suspect the reason for this is that for many years the lot was the site of automobile paint removal shops and garages/service stations. Typically, such lots need to pass pretty stringent environmental tests before they are approved for re-development.

To the west of this location, at Howe and Beach, is where Vancouver House will be located. I expect that an innovative design akin to that of Vancouver House will be proposed, ultimately, for the oddly-shaped lot beneath the Seymour off-ramp.

Looking to the northeast corner of Granville Street at Beach (beneath the current Granville St. Bridge). 2015. Author's photo.

Looking to the northeast corner of Granville Street at Beach (beneath the current Granville St. Bridge). 2015. Author’s photo. The Seymour off-ramp is visible above.

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Top Shop – 1930s Style

CVA 99-4073 - Hudson's Bay Company [interior of store at 674 Granville Street] 1931 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-4073 – Hudson’s Bay Company [interior of store at 674 Granville Street] 1931 Stuart Thomson photo.

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I Scream, You Scream…

CVA 99-4448 - Palm Ice Cream Truck [and driver at 1190 Bute Street making a delivery] ca 1935. Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-4448 – Palm Ice Cream Truck [and driver at 1190 Bute Street making a delivery] ca 1935. Stuart Thomson photo.

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418 Georgia

CVA 99-4373 - Stonehouse Motors [at 418 West Georgia Street] 1933 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-4373 – Stonehouse Motors [at 418 West Georgia Street] 1933 Stuart Thomson photo.

We are looking above at the southwest corner of Homer at Georgia in 1933, where Stonehouse Motors was located for about 20 years (ca1926-45). Prior to that, another automobile dealer was at this site, Knight-Higman Motors (ca1920-25). Before that, for little more than a single year (1917-18), the building was home to the Stettler Cigar Factory (interior image shown below). And in 1916, this building housed the Model Service Garage. From the late 1940s until the 1980s, the site was occupied by Collier’s Ltd., another automobile dealership. Budget Rent-a-Car has occupied the corner (and much of the block) for the period since Collier’s left here.

The brick structure (on the right above and pictured below) still stands today. It was built in 1913 for what seems to have been an investment and real estate multinational (with a local board) called London & British North America Co. Sharp & Thompson were architects (and were responsible for the design of a great many other Vancouver buildings during their 82-year partnership); and Bruce Bros. were the builders.

CVA 1376-337 - [Interior of the Stettler Cigar Factory at 418 West Georgia Street] 1917 or 1918.

CVA 1376-337 – [Interior of the Stettler Cigar Factory at 418 West Georgia Street] 1917 or 1918. (I find this image remarkable, given the period, for the number of females who appear in it. I count 6 females to 9 males; including, possibly, a woman manager – above the fray, literally – atop the stairs on the right).

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57 Varieties: H. J. Heinz in Vancouver

CVA 99-3736 - H.J. Heinz Company 1929 Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-3736 – H.J. Heinz Company (1138 Homer St.) 1929 Stuart Thomson photo.

The building that housed Vancouver's branch of H. J. Heinz these days is home to Brix Restaurant in swish Yaletown. 2015. Author's photo.

The building that housed Vancouver’s branch of H. J. Heinz these days is home to Brix Restaurant in swish Yaletown. (I have a feeling that those square brick window blocks don’t open anymore – as they evidently did during Heinz’s tenancy). 2015. Author’s photo.

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Burrard & Pender: A Century’s Differences

LGN 1236 - [View of northeast corner of Pender and Burrard Streets] 1914. BCER photo,

LGN 1236 – [View of northeast corner of Pender and Burrard Streets] 1914. BCER photo.

IMG_6214

Looking southeast from the northwest corner of Burrard and Pender Streets. 2015. Author’s photo.

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Betwixt and Between

LGN 1240 - [Power lines over intersection of Cambie and Pender Streets] 1914, BCER photo.

LGN 1240 – [Power lines over intersection of Cambie and Pender Streets] 1914, BCER photo.

Looking northwest at corner of Cambie and Pender Streets (looking at Victory Square). 2015. Author's photo.

Looking northwest at corner of Cambie and Pender Streets (looking at Victory Square). 2015. Author’s photo.

This post consists of two 1914 images that appear to have been made on the same day by BCER (and of the mates made last week by the author).

The 1914 images were interesting to me because they were made at one of those retrospectively important historical junctions. Until shortly before this image was made, what would become Victory Square (the cenotaph was unveiled in 1924) had been the first Vancouver courthouse. The courthouse had been demolished by 1914 and the great horrors of the Great War (and the need of a memorial for this first world-wide war) were, to put it mildly, unanticipated.

LGN 1233 - [View of Cambie Street, looking south from near Pender Street] 1914. BCER photo.

LGN 1233 – [View of Cambie Street, looking south from near Pender Street] 1914. BCER photo.

Looking south on Cambie towards Pender (roughly at the corner where the previous 1914 image was made). 2015. Author's photo.

Looking south on Cambie towards Pender (roughly at the corner where the previous 1914 image was made). 2015. Author’s photo.

In this second 1914 photo, the photographer seems to have move to a place part way down Cambie, between Pender (where the earlier image had been made) and Hastings. We are looking towards what was the Vancouver Hospital (on the corner where the parking garage is today). The building on the left of both images was built in 1911 for early Vancouver grocers, the Edgett Bros., and today houses (among others) the Architectural Institute of B.C.

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Telegraphy Class at King George High (1930)

CVA 99-3806 - Telegraphy Department - King Edward High School 1930 Stuart Thomson photo. Note: I don't seen any girls in this class. Perhaps girls weren't warmly welcomed into this sort of class. Perhaps it was similar to the environment in

CVA 99-3806 – Telegraphy Department – King Edward High School 1930 Stuart Thomson photo. Note: I don’t see any girls in this class. Perhaps girls weren’t warmly welcomed into this sort of class. Maybe similar to the environment in “Shop” classes of the 1970s/80s.

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Moonlit Night After Late Shift)

Amended and Cropped Version of CVA 677-538 - View of Street at Sunset (Original Mount specifies location and date as-

Amended and Cropped Version of CVA 677-538 – View of Street at Sunset (Original mount specifies location and date as-“Hastings St, ca 1904”) P. T. Timms photo. (VAIW note: I now believe this image to be taken NOT at sunset, but long after the sun had set and the moon was pretty high in the eastern sky – see the original image linked above).

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Western End of First Georgia Viaduct (1915-71)

This image illustrates for me, yet again, the potential of a photograph to help me see things as they once were. I knew from earlier reading that the first Georgia Viaduct (1915) began and terminated at different points than does the current (1972-installed and twinned) structure of the same name. I had no difficulty visualizing where the eastern end was – thanks to early photographs – but picturing just where the early Viaduct had its western end wasn’t, for me, easy to imagine. Partly, I think, because I hadn’t seen a clearly contextual photo of it with a current and contemporary major landmark in common . . . until today.

The western end of the 1915 Viaduct apparently began about half a block north of where it currently starts (Georgia at Beatty). The southern exposure of the Beatty Street Drill Hall faces the viewer and was close to the western end of the early structure. (Today, the Dunsmuir Viaduct – the westbound twin of the 1972 Georgia Viaduct – runs next to the northern end of the Drill Hall).

The image evidently was made as a promotional photo by Stuart Thomson for the national Department of Public Works shortly after the end of the Great War. The choice of background – the Drill Hall – was a potent and, generally, positive symbol of the role of the federal government in the recently won war (staggering casualties, notwithstanding). In the foreground were symbols of man’s vanquishment over natural impediments to ‘progress’, the 1915 Viaduct and, of course, the federal trucks.

So, as an image of its time, it seems to me to have been successful. And as a help to this amateur historian of a different time, it has proven to be, arguably, even more helpful.

Thanks again, Stuart! (To see other VAIW posts with Thomson images, link here).

CVA 99-237 -

CVA 99-237 – “Federal” trucks [Department of Public Works, B.C.]. Image was made, apparently, at the western entry to the Georgia Viaduct at the time – immediately adjacent to the southern end of the Beatty St. Drill Hall. 1919. Stuart Thomson photo.

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Dr. Tongue’s 3D House of Electrictity (Pretty Scary, Kiddies)!

LGN 947 - [Men working in B.C. Electric testing lab, located above the car barn building on Main Street]. 1914? BCER photo.

LGN 947 – [Men working in B.C. Electric testing lab, located above the car barn building on Main Street]. 1914? BCER photo.

The fellows in this BCER laboratory scene do not seem to have similar comedic sensibilities to those of John Candy or Joe Flaherty (fortunately for them and the BCER), but they do seem to be borderline ‘mad’ scientists, if the equipment and fluids in the room have even a fraction of their apparent flammability!

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Flux and Consistency on Unit Block East Hastings

Detail of CVA 99-3884 - Windsor Hotel [at 52 East Hastings Street]. 1931. Stuart Thomson photo.

Detail of CVA 99-3884 – Windsor Hotel [at 52 East Hastings Street]. 1931. Stuart Thomson photo.

I’m going to begin today’s post with a tightly cropped version of a CVA Stuart Thomson photo of what looks like a lovely commercial district in downtown Vancouver (the full image appears below). In these three shops, as my wife correctly points out, some of the major needs/wants of a man living at the time are covered! He could begin with a stop at Bert’s Barber Shop (where a shave and a haircut are a little more than “2 bits”, but at least he could still get a haircut for that price); while there, conveniently, he could have his hat (a “must-wear” for the well-dressed, urban, middle-class man) steam-cleaned. When he emerged from Hastings Hat Cleaners, our chap could stop in at Windsor Tailors to have a new suit custom-measured for pick up, probably, within a week. And then, leaving there, thoroughly worn out from this series of tasks, our hypothetical fellow could pop into the Log Cabin Lunch for a tasty meal, say, of roast chicken and spuds with a coffee. To me, this still sounds like a couple of hours well spent!

Well, it won’t come as a shock to you (if you paid attention to the the title of the post or to the caption on the photo above) that the photograph is not of Hornby, Howe, or Georgia Streets, where one might expect to find comparable types of shops today, but on the unit block (address numbers less than 100) of East Hastings (near Pioneer Square – aka ‘Pigeon Park’ – at Carrall Street).

CVA 99-3884 - Windsor Hotel [at 52 East Hastings Street]. 1931. Stuart Thomson photo. (Full, uncropped version of the image at the beginning of this post).

CVA 99-3884 – Windsor Hotel [at 52 East Hastings Street]. 1931. Stuart Thomson photo. (Full, uncropped version of the image at the beginning of this post).

There are a couple of things worthy of note, I think. On the one hand, and most obviously, the neighbourhood has changed dramatically. The Windsor Hotel, today, is known (principally by those living in it) as the Washington Hotel (a SRO rooming house) at 52 E Hastings. And in the building adjacent (which, then and now, was called the Gross Building) was, until recently, a pharmacy that has been closed by the authorities, apparently. So it is pretty plain that the sort of shops and those who patronize them have changed.

Less obvious perhaps, is the extent to which the buildings of an earlier Vancouver have been retained. If one looks up and down Howe or Hornby Streets today, for instance, you would be hard-pressed to find any surviving buildings of the vintage represented in this photograph (roughly, of the 19-teens).

In short, one lesson seems to be that poverty tends to be kinder to heritage structures (in terms, at least, of preserving them in some condition) than is great wealth.

The same section of unit block East Hastings. June 2015. Author's photo.

The same section of unit block East Hastings. June 2015. Author’s photo.

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Irwinton Apts

Detail of LGN 1010 - [View of Burrard Street, looking south from Georgia Street]. 1914. BCER photo.

Detail of LGN 1010 – [View of Burrard Street, looking south from Georgia Street]. 1914. BCER photo.

This is a crop of a BC Electric photo of Burrard Street looking to the southwest and made in 1914. The Wesley Methodist Church (William Blackmore, 1902) – an ancestor congregation of St. Andrew’s-Wesley United Church which would be built a couple decades later up the street at the southwest corner of Burrard and Nelson – is just outside of the right frame (to the north).  The six-storey structure in the foreground is the Irwinton Apartment Block (Braunton and Liebert, 1912). And, its tower silhouetted in the distance at the northwest corner of Nelson at Burrard, is the new-ish building of First Baptist Church (Burke, Horwood and White, 1911).

Perhaps the most remarkable element of this image is the very rough shape that unpaved Burrard Street was in!

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Fairview Baptist Church’s Early Years

The first purpose-built home of Fairview Baptist (image taken after Fairview church had moved to other quarters and the space was taken over by a commercial enterprise (note stained glass windows were retained). n.d. (my estimate ca. 1914). First Baptist Church archival collection. (Positive made from negative in archives).

The first purpose-built home of Fairview Baptist. Image taken after Fairview church had moved to Fifth Ave. & Arbutus and the space was taken over by a commercial enterprise. Positive made from the negative using digital software. n.d. (ca. 1910-14). First Baptist Church archival collection.

Fairview Baptist Church, according to First Baptist Church’s first historian W. M. Carmichael, had its beginnings as a regional Sunday School. The school was an extension of First Baptist, launched at a January 1902 prayer meeting. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Peck were then living at the corner of Maple Street and West 3rd Avenue (2001 W. 3rd), where they ran a small grocery. The Pecks had “an unused room” at their home which was offered to the Sunday School. The School met at the Pecks’ for two years. (Note: This Mrs. Peck was not Mary Peck, a charter member of FBC, although she may have been related by marriage to Mary and Elias James Peck).

In 1904, the School moved into its first building at 2008-4th Avenue (near Maple). The building is shown in the image above (with a post-church commercial appendage, probably added between 1910-14). According to Carmichael, this church structure was built for $500. However, a check of the Vancouver Heritage Building Permits shows the cost to have been a bit higher: $1000. The architect/builder was R. E. Scarlett.

On August 23, 1905, the First Baptist members involved in the regional Sunday School “received their letters” from the denomination to organize as a separate church. The church was named Fairview Baptist Church. Rev. Peter H. McEwan was the first pastor. (Before accepting the pastorate at Fairview, McEwan had been the pastor at Emmanuel Baptist Church in Victoria. While there, he served as the construction supervisor for their church building; Thomas Hooper was the architect. The sanctuary was erected for about $8000 in 1892. Remarkably, it still stands as Victoria’s Belfry Theatre.)

By 1909, remarks Carmichael, “because of the laying of the street car tracks along Fourth Avenue”, (due to concerns for the safety of youngsters attending the school and crossing 4th Ave?) they sold this property and raised a new structure at the corner of 5th Avenue and Arbutus Street. This building was designed and built by Samuel Buttrey Birds for an estimated $5,500 (he also built the nearby Fairview Methodist Church at 6th and Fir and Chalmers Presbyterian Church at Hemlock and 12th).

With the move to Arbutus, there ensued an institutional identity crisis. The church’s name was first changed to “Fifth Avenue Baptist Church” and in 1913 it was changed again to “Kitsilano Baptist Church”. In March, 1922, following a tumultuous period for Kits Church and for the denomination generally (there was at least one significant split of the congregation at Kits), the church amalgamated with Central Fairview Baptist to form Fairview Baptist Church. The building which houses Fairview today stands at 1708 W 16th Ave (near Pine).

Principal Sources:

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A Tale of Two Sanctuaries

Pre 1931 Fire interior FBC Sanctuary

The interior of the original sanctuary of First Baptist Church at Burrard & Nelson (facing the south wall) before the fire which all but destroyed it in February, 1931. (Positive produced from a negative using Photoshop Express). First Baptist Church archival collection. n.d.

The image above shows the interior of the sanctuary at First Baptist Church (Burrard & Nelson). However, close inspection reveals differences from today’s sanctuary. In fact, this photo shows the sanctuary before the 1931 fire which all but destroyed that part of the Church. (For more about the fire, see the conclusion of this post).

The camera is facing the Nelson Street entry to the sanctuary (taken probably from the podium on which the preacher and choir typically stand).

There are at least three markers that speak to differences between the older space and the new one created for FBC by Dominion Construction in 1931: (1) The lack of clear demarcation of a foyer/narthex from the sanctuary. Today, there is a wall of wood and glass, with doors into the sanctuary which may be closed during services. There is no sign of a wall in the image above. There appear to be horizontal wooden slats that rise approximately to waist height, but that’s it; the view of the stairs leading to the balcony on either side of the Nelson St. doors is unobstructed (and I imagine it would have been more difficult to disguise the noise of one’s late arrival to a service — even if the wooden stairs were carpeted!). The principal motive for this very open design feature was likely to let in as much natural light as possible in the days before inexpensive and easily accessible electricity.

(2) The horseshoe-shaped balcony (still present today) is ringed with what appears to be much more porous construction than we have in the post-fire rebuild (see image below). The pre-fire balcony wall appears to have consisted of a series of dowels within a wooden frame as contrasted with the, no-doubt safer (especially for young ones) but less open, balcony wall of today.

(3) Different light fixtures. The pre-fire fixtures visible above seemed to include a much greater number of bulbs – twelve in each visible fixture – as compared with the five present on comparable fixtures today. It isn’t clear from the photo how many fixtures were in the original sanctuary, but it’s likely that there were fewer than today. It also isn’t clear whether or not there were single-bulbed fixtures over each balcony gallery, as we have today.

Another feature which I believe was significantly different between the two sanctuaries, but which isn’t visible in the pre-fire image, is the ceiling-work. The original ceiling, installed when the building was constructed in 1910-11 was, I believe, similar in appearance (at least to a layman, like me) to the ceiling in Christ Church Cathedral (Burrard & Georgia) – i.e., a good deal of exposed wooden beam-work. The ceiling in the later sanctuary consists of a series of tiles (probably intended to improve acoustical quality).

VPL 23402 Interior FBC Nov 11, 1931 (after reconstruction of the sanctuary). Dominion photo.

VPL 23402 Interior FBC Nov 11, 1931 (after reconstruction of the sanctuary). Dominion photo.

CVA 1376-666 - [Interior of First Baptist Church at Nelson Street and Burrard Street after the fire], 1931.CVA 1376-666 - [Interior of First Baptist Church at Nelson Street and Burrard Street after the fire]. The water from the hoses of firefighters frozen onto the remains of the sanctuary. February, 1931.

CVA 1376-666 – [Interior of First Baptist Church at Nelson Street and Burrard Street after the fire]. The water from the hoses of firefighters frozen onto the remains of the sanctuary. I believe the camera is facing the opposite direction from the first photo in this post. We are looking at the north wall of the sanctuary (roughly where the fire was believed to have started; the photographer is likely standing near the baptistry). February, 1931.

Fire Destroys Sanctuary in ’31

In FBC’s official history, author and FBC member Les Cummings described the fire:

In the early morning hours of February 10, 1931, the fire swept through our church. The blaze was one of the most spectacular in the history of the downtown district, the flames shooting through the slate roof and attracting hundreds of early morning workers. Fire Chief C W. Thompson said the blaze started directly behind the organ. When he realized that the main sanctuary was doomed, he concentrated the firefighters’ efforts on saving the tower housing the chimes, and the Sunday School [Pinder Hall]. They stood alone, while the church itself became a mass of ruins. (Our First Century, Leslie J. Cummings, 1987 (Updated 2002), 42).

What caused the fire, to the best of my knowledge, was never determined.

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Theo Gaerdes

LGN 1228 - [Power lines in front of the Grandview Sheet Metal Works building at 1685 Venables Street]. 1913? BCER.

LGN 1228 – [Power lines in front of the Grandview Sheet Metal Works building at 1685 Venables Street]. 1913? BCER.

The building above, which housed Grandview Sheet Metal Works at 1685 Venables Street, was (according to Vancouver Heritage building permit records) designed by a C. Smidt and built in 1912, by James Dryden for Theodore Geardes (who was also the proprietor of the sheet metal business). In addition to the commercial space on the main floor (1685), there was also an apartment (1683). (The Gaerdes block is adjacent to the building – to the right, above – known to Commercial Drive residents as the home of Uprising Breads Bakery (1697), which had been built a year earlier for J. F. Malkin, designed by Samuel B. Birds.) I wasn’t able to find any other record of a building designed by anyone called Smidt. There were a couple of projects designed by a C. and Carl Schmidt in the permit database; but there is no record of a Smidt or a Schmidt in the Biographical Dictionary of Canadian Architects.

VPL 11530. Grandview Sheet Metal Works, Ltd. at 1739 Venables St.  Demonstration of Smokeless Furnace. 1926. Frank Leonard photo

VPL 11530. Grandview Sheet Metal Works, Ltd. at 1739 Venables St. Demonstration of Smokeless Furnace. 1926. Frank Leonard photo

It isn’t clear to me how long Grandview Sheet Metal Works was located at 1685. By 1926, however, it seems to have moved up a block to 1739 Venables, where this VPL image was made. Who was Theo Gaerdes (beyond being a man possessed of no small ego; would a retiring fellow have had his name inscribed into the prominent upper part of his building?) He was the youngest of the five children of John H. and Katrina Gaerdes (one girl in the bunch). It seems that he was born in the U.S. (he was ethnically German) and lived there briefly, but most of his years were spent in Vancouver. He worked as an employee of early Vancouver tinsmith, James H. Hatch, and later partnered with William A. Hughes to form Gaerdes & Hughes (tinsmiths) before striking out on his own at age 26 to establish Grandview Sheet Metal Works. He married Marion May and they died almost exactly 2 months apart in 1973 (MMG, March 29; TG, May 28). As a side note, a couple of Gaerdes were associated with a building mentioned in an earlier VAIW post. John H. (TG’s dad) was proprietor of the Louvre Hotel (323 Carrall St) and TG’s brother, Herman, was manager of the Louvre Cafe (same address as Hotel). I haven’t been able to learn when 1685 Venables was demolished.

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Mucky Lane Work

Detail of LGN 1130 - [Electric power lines running above lane east of Granville Street]. 1914. BCER.

Detail of LGN 1130 – [Electric power lines running above lane east of Granville Street]. 1914. BCER photo.

I have become quite fond of the work done in the early years of the 20th century by BC Electric Railway photographers. Most of these anonymous souls don’t seem to me to have been amateurs (although a few images are very over-exposed). The aspect of the BCER images which I most like is that they were differently motivated than were many commercial shots made by photographers for other clients. For the BCER, photographers seem to have been instructed (especially in the early years of power) to ‘shoot anything with wires’! Whether or not they were actually so instructed, many of the early BCER images capture scenes that weren’t attempted by many others for whatever reasons, often, I suspect — as with this image — because the scene wasn’t believed to be appealing to most viewers of their day.

Plainly the main motive for this shot (of which this is a cropped part) was to capture the electrical lines in this back lane ‘east of Granville Street’. In 1914, lanes were typically little more than dirt (or after some rain, as above, mud) trails. This shows a couple of garbage pickers of the day (whether official or unofficial). Their pony and wagon seem to be to the right. And, like today, “J. G.” couldn’t resist scrawling his or her initials on a lane-way wall (granite window sill at right, foreground).

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First Baptist Footie Champs

CVA 99-3593 - First Baptist (Church) Football Team - Junior League Champions 1924-25. 1925. Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-3593 – First Baptist (Church) Football Team – Junior League Champions 1924-25. 1925. Stuart Thomson photo. The names beneath the image are Leonard Wilfred Horton (Who ultimately became manager of Peterson Cowan Elevators in Vancouver; son of RBH), R. Rolston, W. A. Eisner; R. D. Sinclair, Reginald Bertram Horton (Who was a clerk at Smith Davidson & Wright Stationers at Homer & Davie, 1881-1945; team trainer), Lorne Austin Fisher (Who became a sheet metal worker for Terminal Sheet Metal Works in the Dominion Bldg and later became self-employed; 1910-68), A. D. Lockwood, Harold Judson Witter (Salesman for A. MacDonald, a large grocery supplier based at 840 Cambie; 1880-1957; Chair of FBC’s Athletics Dept.), G. Kain; Dr. John Jacob Ross  (1870-1935; FBC’s Pastor), G. Niblo, Reginald Donald Horton (another son of RBH), A. D Sewell (Team Captain), A. D. Hunter, Percy Roland McGregor (Bookkeeper/accountant also, like Witter, employed by grocery supplier A. MacDonald; 1903-59; Team Manager); F. McNeill (Team Mascot).

This photo makes me smile. It was taken in 1925 by one of my favourite early Vancouver photographers, Stuart Thomson, at the present site of First Baptist Church (Burrard and Nelson Streets). The young men in the image were apparently a group of sporty lads associated with FBC who had won the Junior League  Football Championship in 1924-25.

IMG_5443 B O PInder (FBC Archives)

B. O. Pinder. First Baptist Church Archives. n.d.

This photo was made a few years prior to the 1931 fire which all but destroyed the Sanctuary. It was taken at the point where the wing known then as the Sunday School (today called Pinder Hall) met the Sanctuary building (for some context, see the early image of the church building here). As a side note, the person after whom Pinder Hall was named many years later, Sunday School Superintendent B. O. Pinder, was active in church leadership at the time of the image above.

The adults flanking the team in the first row are the ones who make me grin. Mr. McGregor (Manager) does not look like an easy man to please. I have confirmed that he was born in Vancouver, but I think I detect an ancestral Scots burr behind his scowl (believe it or not, he was only 22 years old when this image was made; to my eye, he appears to be at least 30).

Dr. J. J. Ross (Pastor, 1923-29), after whose wife, Georgina, the “Ross Room” would much later be named is on the left. I don’t know what that tag was on JJR’s suit, but to my eye it looks like a modified price tag (although what it was modified to,Screen Shot 2015-06-02 at 6.03.33 AM is a mystery to me. See the closer view of JJR’s lapel at right; I cannot distinguish what it says/portrays. If anyone else can, please let me know)! In any case, it seems all but certain that when Georgina Ross learned that JJR had his photographic portrait taken with this tag-like object hanging off his lapel, she had something to say about it!

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Fishing Was Good

CVA 1477-870 - [Two women with fishing gear and dog], 1920-25.

CVA 1477-870 – [Two women with fishing gear and dog], 1920-25.

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Hooray for (un-sung) Eveleigh!

Screen Shot 2015-05-27 at 6.43.31 AM

From “British Columbians As We See ‘Em. 1910-11”. Caricatures of prominent BC Residents.

Sydney Morgan Eveleigh (1870-1947) was a Vancouver architect. He was born in England, coming to Vancouver in 1888. He worked with early Vancouver architect Noble Hoffar for several years and later struck a partnership with William T. Dalton. After Dalton retired (1922), Eveleigh was elected president of the Architectural Institute of B.C. and later continued to practice until retiring in 1940.

But it wasn’t Eveleigh’s accomplishments as an architect that make him noteworthy, in my judgement. It was his unpaid community contributions. He was a member of the Art Workers Guild (ca 1900) which later became the Vancouver Arts and Crafts Association. According to the City of Vancouver Archives, “[t]he members of the association held annual exhibitions and sales of work [at O’Brien Hall, in 1900] and conducted art classes throughout the year.”

Most importantly, however, according to the Changing Vancouver site, Eveleigh was a local library board member for several years and was instrumental in the establishment of the first permanent site for Vancouver Public Library: “It was he who contacted Andrew Carnegie, and the five $10,000 cheques that helped build the [Carnegie] library were personally made out to Eveleigh.”

If I may be permitted a bit of a rant – why, in light of S. M. Eveleigh’s contributions to this city, have most residents (I’d wager) never heard of him? A street was named in his honour, but it was never very much of a street (one block hidden today as a back alley and entry to two immense parking structures behind Bentall Centre). Granted, Eveleigh wasn’t a CPR big-wig and, therefore, wasn’t well-connected to the likes of Lauchlan Hamilton (who was responsible for early street naming in Vancouver; according to Street Names of Vancouver, when Hamilton was asked in 1936 by Major J. S. Matthews why Eveleigh Street was so named, Hamilton “could not remember”). Nor did he have the good fortune to have been born with a silver spoon in his mouth (e.g., Granville).

Would it not be appropriate to consider naming a VPL library branch after Eveleigh? Or something else a little more prominent than the pokey wee alley that today bears his name?

CVA 357-3 - Eveleigh Street (West of Burrard), 1925.

CVA 357-3 – Eveleigh Street (West of Burrard), 1925.

Eveleigh

Eveleigh “Street” today (really a back alley with access to two huge parking garages that service Bentall Centre). 2015. Author’s photo.

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Suzette’s on Howe

VPL 81119 - Suzette's Sportswear exterior at 660 Howe St. (Today, this is roughly where the Four Seasons Hotel and the mid-Howe St. entry to Pacific Centre Mall are located). 1949. Artray Studio.

VPL 81119 – Suzette’s Sportswear exterior at 660 Howe St. (Today, this is roughly where the Four Seasons Hotel and the mid-Howe St. entry to Pacific Centre Mall are located). 1949. Artray Studio.

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933 West Pender

CVA 99-3479 - Chevrolet Sales Co (according to CVA this is

CVA 99-3479 – Chevrolet Sales Co (according to CVA this is “car lot 1105 Granville Street”, but in fact is 933 W Pender Street). ca1924. Stuart Thomson photo.

Screen Shot 2015-05-25 at 8.22.22 AMThis fine image by Stuart Thomson was made ca1924 at the 900 block of West Pender Street – not the 1100 block of Granville Street. There are at least three clues to the actual location: (1) Abbotsford Hotel (still standing today at 921 W Pender; known today as “Days Inn”) is just behind the Chevy lot; (2) the 1924 BC Directory shows a Chevy lot at 933 W Pender; (3) a magnified look at the image shows the number “933” pretty clearly on the glass door of the pictured dealership.

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’52 Faces of CBA

Detail of VLP 48.3 - The Canadian Bar Association 34th Annual Meeting (Buffet Dinner at U.B.C. Library Lawn) 1952, Fred W. Sunday

CVS: VLP 48.3 – Detail of the Canadian Bar Association 34th Annual Meeting (Buffet Dinner at U.B.C. Library Lawn) 1952, Fred W. Sunday.

VLP 48.3 – The Canadian Bar Association 34th Annual Meeting (Buffet Dinner at U.B.C. Library Lawn) – Main Library in background – 1952, Fred W. Sunday.

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Things Still are a Little Chaotic Here

CVA: SGN 1085.2 - [People hanging on to back of streetcar at Hastings and Carrall Streets], 1896?  William M. Stark, photo

CVA: SGN 1085.2 – [People hanging on to back of streetcar at Hastings and Carrall Streets], 1896? William M. Stark, photo

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Old Kits Presbyterian Church (1911-1925)

cva-1187-37-st-stephens-united-church-exterior-ca-1950-artona

CVA 1187-37. Former Kitsilano Presbyterian Church exterior (later, St. Stephen’s United Church). ca 1950. Artona Studio photo. (Note: I have adjusted the exposure on this very over-exposed image).

A friend noticed this striking older building at 1855 Vine Street (between 3rd and 4th Avenues), which today consists of private condo units. She asked me if I’d encountered it and if I had any idea what the original purpose was of the structure. I replied negatively to both questions. But I certainly was intrigued!

I first checked online to see whether there was any low-hanging fruit there. I found some realty descriptions, such as this one, which noted that the building was of beaux-arts style, and was formerly “a Presbyterian Sabbath School”, built ca1911. Assuming this info was accurate, that was pretty impressive detail for a realty site. I learned elsewhere that in the 1970s, the building had housed the Vancouver Indian Centre (ancestor to the Vancouver Aboriginal Friendship Centre), until it occurred to those running the centre that Kitsilano wasn’t densely inhabited by aboriginal people in the 1970s (unlike the 1870s, comparatively speaking) and they moved nearer to where most of their constituency resided.

So, what went on between ca1911 and 1970?

I knew that most Presbyterian churches in Vancouver did not retain ‘Presbyterian’ in their names after 1925, due to the ‘church union’ movement which subsumed most Methodist, Congregationalist, and (roughly two-thirds of) Presbyterian congregations into a new protestant denomination to be known as the United Church of Canada. I had been to the Bob Stewart Archives (BSA) of UCC on a previous occasion, when it was still in the basement of the Iona Building at UBC. But since the Vancouver School of Theology had sold that building to UBC in 2014, I found that BSA had moved to Kerrisdale (across Yew Street from Ryerson United Church at the United Church Memorial Centre).

I set up an appointment with BC Conference Archivist, Blair Galston. At BSA, Blair had set aside a file full of documents pertaining to the former Kitsilano Presbyterian Church. From these papers I learned a great deal:

  • church got its start in 1906 in a small store building on Cornwall near Yew;
  • first pastor, Rev. Dr. Peter Wright, accepted a call to Kits in 1907. He retired from the post in 1913 and died in 1914. Subsequent full-time/permanent pastors of Kitsilano Presbyterian were Rev. A. D. MacKinnon (1914-20) and Rev Gordon Dickie (1922-39); Dickie left Kits to accept an appointment to Union College (the predecessor to Vancouver School of Theology);
  • congregation officially named Kitsilano Presbyterian Church on March 5/07 with 35 charter members;
  • by ca1909, the small store space had become too small for the congregation and lots were purchased “at the corner of 3rd Ave. and Vine St. for a new church”;
  • following the launch of a fundraising campaign, “proposals were received from various architects, and a plan made by Mr. H. B. Watson was selected for the Sunday School Hall, to be erected on the rear of the lots, leaving the 3rd Ave. side for a church building at a later date”. (I suspect, but have been unable to prove, that the Sunday School – or “Sabbath School” – structure was the only part of the church ever constructed. Church services seem to have been held in the Sunday School structure. There never was, as far as I can tell, any separate Presbyterian church building on 3rd Ave). Architect Henry Barton Watson also built St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church (2881 Main St), Queen Alexandra School 1300 E. Broadway), and Empress Hotel (235 E. Hastings Street), all still standing;
  • contract awarded June 1/10 to John Watson Bros. for a sum totalling $23,868.23;
  • building completed and first service held within it in January, 1911;
  • in 1917, despite loss of many young men during WWI, Kits Presbyterian was ‘having its day,’ with membership at 881 and the Sunday School roll having 467 people, including 32 teachers/officers.

Following the 1925 vote by the Kits church to join the union movement, Kitsilano Presbyterian Church was renamed St. Stephen’s United Church. This was not the same St. Stephen’s congregation that stands today at Granville St. near 54th. That (confusingly) is a different church with a different (and much briefer) history.

St. Stephens Kits apparently was unable to recapture its glory years. The number of people who attended the church dropped to such an extent over the years, that by 1952 St. Stephens United amalgamated with Crosby United Church and became Kitsilano United Church at the former Crosby building at 2nd Ave. and Larch Street. There were a couple of other twists and turns in the stories of these congregations which can be tracked here, if you are curious. But the short(er) story is that Kitsilano United ultimately became what today is Trinity United Church in a new-ish structure which the congregation shares with St. Mark’s Anglican Church at 2nd Ave. and Larch.

What happened to the original Kitsilano Presbyterian Church building? It’s unclear (to me, anyway) just what happened in the period 1952-1970. It’s possible that the building sat empty during those years. By 1970, the Vancouver Indian Centre had taken up occupancy (as mentioned earlier in this post). They vacated by 1979, and nothing much appears to have been done with the building in the years 1979-84.

By 1985, the word “heritage” had come into fashion in Vancouver. The Sinclair Centre project was in full swing, and (among other heritage projects), the former Kits Presbyterian Church building was being renovated (relatively sensitively) for private condominium residences (5 suites). And so it remains today, with the slightly snooty, non-Presbyterian name (in my opinion), Devon Court (Donald O’Callaghan, architect).

Shows renovation of former Kits Presbyterian Church/St. Stephen's United Church into private condo dwellings. In 'Real Estate Weekly,' Feb 15, 1985; no photo credit shown. From Bob Stewart Archives - BC Conference, United Church of Canada.

Shows renovation of former Kits Presbyterian Church/St. Stephen’s United Church into private condo dwellings. In ‘Real Estate Weekly,’ Feb 15, 1985; no photo credit shown. From Bob Stewart Archives – BC Conference, United Church of Canada.

Former Kits Presbyterian Church structure. Now condominium units. 2015. Author's photo.

Former Kits Presbyterian Church structure. Now condominium units. 2015. Author’s photo.

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’49 Chevy Fleetside Deluxe Fastback

VPL 83858 - Series of Images of 1949 Chevrolet [Fleetside Deluxe Fastback], Pontiac, Oldsmobile automobiles parked in front of Colliers Ltd., 741 Homer Street. 1949. Tom Christopherson photo.

VPL 83858 – Series of Images of 1949 Chevrolet [Fleetside Deluxe Fastback] automobile parked in front of Colliers Ltd., 741 Homer Street. 1949. Tom Christopherson photo.

Once again, I’m indebted to my buddy, Wes, for knowing and sharing the name of this vehicle (it wasn’t specifically identified in the VPL online record). The location was 741 Homer Street, which today is (roughly) the Budget Rent-A-Car lot adjacent to the former Ford Theatre (now occupied by Westside Church), just across Homer from the Central Banch of Vancouver Public Library.

Interestingly (to me, anyway), the year that this image was made, George H. Hewitt Co. (the subject of a post a couple of days ago) was located across Homer (on one of the lots where VPL Central stands today).

The Fleetside Fastback was parked in front of the service department of Collier’s, a GM dealership (shown below).

VPL 27909. Collier's Ltd, SE Corner Georgia & Richards 1949, Dominion Photo.

VPL 27909. Collier’s Ltd, SE Corner Georgia & Richards (a friend has described this building , which was located around the corner from the service dept. on Homer, as being “Jetsons’ Art Moderne”). 1949, Dominion Photo.

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TelusGardens

CVA: LGN 482 - [Buildings at southeast corner of Georgia and Seymour Streets], 1890?

CVA: LGN 482 – [Buildings at southeast corner of Georgia and Seymour Streets], 1890? Note: The Congregational Church is just barely in the image (on the left) and Boston Bakery and Confectionery is on the right (Seymour Street).

Looking toward the SW corner of Seymour at Georgia, at the TelusGardens condominium and office towers complex. 2015. Author's photo.

Looking toward the SW corner of Seymour at Georgia, at the TelusGardens condominium and office towers complex. 2015. Author’s photo.

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Fisherman’s Union

IMG_3873IMG_3871IMG_3868

Untitled art. Fisherman’s Union Building (1968), Leonard Epp artist.

This pre-cast concrete relief triptych is on three sides of the former Fisherman’s Union building (1968) at NE corner East Hastings and Hawkes (today, home to AIDS Vancouver).

VPL Clipping File of BC Artists (no date or attribution shown).

VPL Clipping File of BC Artists (no date or attribution shown). Portrait of Leonard Epp

According to Steil’s and Stalker’s excellent resource, Public Art in Vancouver: Angels Among Lions, this was the creation of Leonard (sometimes spelled “Leonhard”) Epp. The three fishing-related forms appear in different orders on each of the three walls of the building (note: above, each of the forms has been cropped separately to maximize the amount of each form that is not covered by vegetation). The buiding was designed by Robert Harrison, whose other work included the W.A.C. Bennett Library at SFU (Burnaby Mountain).

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George H. Hewitt Co., Ltd.

Detail of Bu N290.2 - [Arts and Crafts building at 576 Seymour Street] 1927, W. J. Moore photo

Detail of Bu N290.2 – Shows George H. Hewitt Co., Ltd.

When I first saw the George H. Hewitt rubber stamp company in the image above, it occurred to me that this was a business that must surely have disappeared with the dawn of the 21st century – until I started to do a little digging and discovered that George H. Hewitt had been in business in Vancouver for some years before this photograph was made (since 1898) and is still around today! The history of the firm is detailed on their website.

A key to the longevity of this ‘stamp’ business (like most businesses, I imagine) is adapting to a changing market. As you will see from Hewitt’s website, they have widened their business to offer, for example, name badges to conference-goers and identity tags for pets.

CVA 371-66 - [George H. Hewitt], ca 1935.

CVA 371-66 – [George H. Hewitt], ca 1935.

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Yikes!

CVA 180-4190 - Phyllis Diller with mannequin wearing Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin's Apollo 11 spacesuit in Pacific Coliseum display, 1969.

CVA 180-4190 – Phyllis Diller with mannequin wearing Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin’s Apollo 11 spacesuit in Pacific Coliseum display, 1969.

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Yellow Sub Records

CVA 780-236 - [Yellow Submarine Records at] 319 East Broadway and [a house at] 323 East Broadway,  1975.

CVA 780-236 – [Yellow Submarine Records at] 319 East Broadway and [a house at] 323 East Broadway, 1975.

The Yellow Submarine record shop shown above in 1975 and the commercial building to the left of it appear still to stand. Unfortunately, the baby-blue-coloured home on the other side of the Sub seems to be gone.

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Toronto House Apartments

VPL 11463. Toronto House Apartments, 769 E. Hastings. 1923. Stuart Thomson photo.

VPL 11463. Toronto House Apartments, 769 E. Hastings. 1923. Stuart Thomson photo.

Toronto House apartments had been around for about a decade when photographer Stuart Thomson made the Vancouver Public Library image above. It later became the Astoria Hotel. The apartment block was built in 1912 for owner R. A. Wallace and was designed by architects Hugh Braunton and John Liebert. Toronto House was built at the peak of Vancouver’s boom and, according to Don Luxton, ed.’s Building the West, in addition to Toronto/Astoria they were successful in obtaining the commission for Irwinton Apartments (777 Burrard), still standing. The Standard Trust and Industrial Building (570 Seymour) is another block still standing that was designed by B&L in 1913 (also known as the Rexmere Rooms block with a slightly different address and separate entry at 568 Seymour). Braunton and Liebert both left Vancouver by 1914 (after working here as partners for just a few, but architecturally prolific, years); apparently, they moved to El Paso, Texas and later to California.

Neon signage for Astoria Hotel, 769 East Hastings (formerly Toronto House Apartments), 2015. Author's photo.

Neon signage for Astoria Hotel, 769 East Hastings (formerly Toronto House Apartments), 2015. Author’s photo.

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Coal Harbour and Rowing Club (1889)

CVA: Bu P194 - The Inlet, Vancouver [showing the Vancouver Rowing Club buildings], 1889. (S. J.) Thompson photo.

CVA: Bu P194 – The Inlet, Vancouver [showing the Vancouver Rowing Club buildings], 1889. (S. J.) Thompson photo.

In my judgement, this is definitely an image made by S. J. Thompson, although his first initials do not appear on the print (and although it isn’t attributed to SJT by the City of Vancouver Archives). It is technically possible that John E. Thompson made this image, but to my eye, it cries out “S. J. Thompson made this!”

(Note the evidence of habitation at this time on Deadman’s Island).

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The Arctic Club

VPL 80597 Interior of Arctic Club and members.  1948. Artray studio.

VPL 80597 Interior of Arctic Club and members. 1948. Artray studio.

The Arctic Club was one of several cocktail and supper clubs that were part of Vancouver in the late 1940s and 1950s (the Palomar and the World were two other examples). According to some remembrances of the place on the Vancouver Jazz Forum, the Arctic was  a “suit and tie” place where you needed  to display a  purchased membership card and sign in before entering. It was located at 724 W. Pender (south side of Pender, near Howe) .

The Arctic Club is but a memory today; according to VJF members, by the early 1960s, one of the owners, Bob Mitton, closed the club when he purchased the (by-then longish-in-the-tooth) Cave supper club around that time (just a quick walk away on the 600 block of Hornby). By the late-1960s, preparation would have been underway at the former Arctic Club site for construction of the office towers that today dominate the block at 700 W. Pender (1972) and 750 W. Pender (1974).

VPL 83118 Arctic Club interior series. 724 West Pender Street. 1948. Artray Studio.

VPL 83118 Arctic Club interior series. 724 West Pender Street. 1948. Artray Studio.

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The Shark Has Pretty Teeth, Dear

CVA: Str N100 - [Houses being demolished on south west corner of Georgia and Beatty streets]. 1940. W. J. Moore photo.

CVA: Str N100 – [Houses being demolished on south west corner of Georgia and Beatty streets]. 1940. W. J. Moore photo.

SW corner Beatty and Georgia streets. Sandman Inn hotel (with Shark Club on main floor). 2015. Author's photo.

SW corner Beatty and Georgia streets. Sandman Inn (with Shark Club bar on main floor). 2015. Author’s photo.

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I Can Live on Peanuts…

VPL 81021A. Sept 3 1949. Artray Studio.

VPL 81021A. Sept 3 1949. Artray Studio.

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One of Our Early Flatirons

M-11-32 - Europe Hotel. 191- . Richard Broadbridge photo.

M-11-32 – Europe Hotel. 191- . Richard Broadbridge photo.

Former Hotel Europe. 43 Powell Street.. ca 2011. Author's photo.

Former Hotel Europe. 43 Powell Street.. ca 2011. Author’s photo.

The building which was formerly the Hotel Europe (and, indeed, is still remembered as such) was designed by Parr and Fee for Angelo Calori and was constructed in 1908-09. It was, apparently, the third of Calori’s hotels. It isn’t clear where the first one was located, but the second hotel was (and still is) adjacent to (and remains an annex to) the flatiron block.

 Parr and Fee clearly seem to have been influenced by Daniel Burnham’s Flatiron building (much taller than its 6-storey Vancouver cousin) in NYC (1902), shown below.

According to one source, whom I trust, Angelo Calori may also have owned the Princess Theatre (which in later years became the Lux Theatre and, more recently, a non-market housing block also called the Lux.

The Europe Hotel has been used as a set in various movies, including The Changeling (1980), Legends of the Fall (1994), and The Never Ending Story (1984).

Another early Vancouver flatiron block is here.

Flatiron Building New York NY. 1902. Form: Vintagemedia.wordpress.com

Flatiron Building New York NY. 1902. Form: Vintagemedia.wordpress.com

CVA 99-3893 - Hotel Europe [at 43 Powell Street]. 1931. Stuart Thomson photo. (Taken a little ways up Powell Street and looking back at the hotel).

CVA 99-3893 – Hotel Europe [at 43 Powell Street]. 1931. Stuart Thomson photo. (Taken a little ways up Powell Street and looking back at the hotel).

Looking at the main entry to the building from part way up Powell Street.

Looking at the main entry to the building from part way up Powell Street.

CVA 677-945 - [Front hall and stairway], Europe Hotel [43 Powell Street]. ca 1972. Art Grice photo.

CVA 677-945 – [Front hall and stairway], Europe Hotel [43 Powell Street]. ca 1972. Art Grice photo.

Lobby of the former Hotel Europe building, looking from the Powell Street door (instead of from the Alexander Street side, as Photographer Grice appears to have done in the previous image). 2015. Author's photos.

Lobby of the former Hotel Europe building, looking from the Powell Street door (instead of from the Alexander Street side, as Photographer Grice appears to have done in the previous image). 2015. Author’s photos.

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Sedgewick to the Fourth Power

UBC Archives. Main Library - Akrigg, G. Philip V.; Eagles, Blythe Alfred; Robbins, William; Daniells, Roy. 1965, College library renamed Sedgewick Library.

UBC Archives. Main Library – Akrigg, G. Philip V.; Eagles, Blythe Alfred; Robbins, William; Daniells, Roy. 1965, College library renamed Sedgewick Library.

In these times when the almighty dollar is king, the norm is that he/she/they who donate the largest wad of cash to the construction of a building gets it named after him/her/them. This appears not to have been the case at UBC in the relatively recent past, with two libraries, a reading room, and a lecture series named in honour of Professor Garnett Sedgewick. GS was the first head of the department of English and he lectured on Chaucer and Shakespeare. There is no evidence available online that he left a substantial sum to the university upon his passing in 1949.

The first image (above) is of “College Library” at its renaming as “Sedgewick Library”. This original Sedgewick Library was located in the east(ish) wing of the Main Library (shown below). This space was occupied by the Special Collections Division of the library when I was at UBC in the early 1990s. (And, if memory serves, was where graduate students deposited completed theses).

UBC Archives. 1965. College Sedgewick Library entrance Main Library.

UBC Archives. 1965. College Sedgewick Library entrance Main Library.

The two images below show the Sedgewick Undergraduate Library as I knew it when I was a student at UBC. The night shot shows a library skylight — one of the few photographable exterior features of the library, since the principal defining feature of ‘Sedge’ that it was an underground library.

UBC Archives. 1977. Main Library at night with Sedgewick Library skylight in foreground.

UBC Archives. 1977. Main Library at night with Sedgewick Library skylight in foreground.

There was a 1960s feel to Sedge. This isn’t surprising, given that it was built in the early 1970s and opened in 1973.

UBC Archives. 1978. Student in Sedgewick Library.

UBC Archives. 1978. Student in Sedgewick Library.

This final image is of the Sedgewick Memorial Reading Room in the Main Library.

UBC Archives. ca 1953. Sedgewick Memorial Reading Room (in Main Library).

UBC Archives. ca 1953. Sedgewick Memorial Reading Room (in Main Library).

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Anglican Theological College, (Chancellor Building) UBC

Bu P676 - [Exterior of Main Library at the University of British Columbia]. 1932. P. T. Timms photo. Note:  ATC appears above Main Library and to the left of the image.

Bu P676 – [Exterior of Main Library at the University of British Columbia]. 1932. P. T. Timms photo. Note:  ATC appears above Main Library and to the left of the image.

Anglican Theological College (1927-71) appears above the Main Library (now called Irving K. Barber Learning Centre) in a structure known as the Chancellor Building. Union College (later known as Vancouver School of Theology), with which ATC would merge in 1971, appears to the right of the library in what is called the Iona Building. VST and UBC announced in 2014 that VST had sold the Iona building to UBC. UBC planned at that time to house all or part of the Economics department in Iona, beginning in 2015. VST has temporarily relocated to St. Andrew’s Hall (a theological college of the Presbyterian Church in Canada). Chancellor was destroyed by VST in 2007.

CVA 677-191 - Chapel of Anglican College [later part of the Vancouver School of Theology], 1934. P. T. Timms photo.

CVA 677-191 – Chapel of Anglican [Theological] College. 1934. P. T. Timms photo.

CVA 677-742 - Dining hall, Anglican College, Vancouver, B.C. 1929. P. T. Timms photo.

CVA 677-742 – Dining hall, Anglican [Theological] College, Vancouver, B.C. 1929. P. T. Timms photo.

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Canada Garage on Homer

CVA 1399-529 - [Photograph of Canada Garage]. 1925. Dominion Photo.

CVA 1399-529 – [Photograph of Canada Garage]. 1925. Dominion Photo.

This image from the 1920s is of the Canada Garage. This lot is adjacent to the lane that divides the east side of the block from the Victoria Apartments (now Hotel). This space was home to automobile garages of different names for several decades: from the 1930s until the 1950s (at least), it was Pacific Garage; by the 1970s, it had become Marine Garage.

Today this space hosts a hair service outlet: Zone Hair Gallery. The building in which Zone is situated finally changed. There is no longer any sign of the former garage structure. Zone is located within a lower-rise structure that includes the entry to the BC Hydro HQ parking garage (to the north of the multi-storey current Hydro building at Dunsmuir and Homer).

At Zone, the staff probably offer a “washing” service, just as Canada Garage did; probably not “greasing”, however!

CVA 1376-672 - [Exterior of Pacific Garage at 524 Homer Street]. 1930.

CVA 1376-672 – [Exterior of Pacific Garage at 524 Homer Street]. 1930.

CVA 778-197 - 500 Homer Street east side. 1974.

CVA 778-197 – 500 Homer Street east side. 1974.

528 Homer Street (east side; adjacent to lane separating Victoria Hotel from the Hydro HQ lower-rise annex). Zone hair salon. 2015. Author's photo.

528 Homer Street (east side; adjacent to lane separating Victoria Hotel from the Hydro HQ lower-rise annex). Zone hair salon. 2015. Author’s photo.

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Corona Salesmen?

CVA 99-1532 - McDawson, three men in front of Vancouver Typewriter Co. [340 West Pender Street], ca1926. Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-1532 – McDawson [?], three men in front of Vancouver Typewriter Co. [340 West Pender Street], ca1926. Stuart Thomson photo.

On the exterior, this shop looks mostly unchanged today; it houses a barber shop (adjacent to The Paper Hound Bookshop in the Victoria Block).

Essi's Hair Salon (and Paper Hound bookshop) on Pender near Homer Street in the Victoria Block. 2015. Author's photo.

Essi’s Hair Salon (and Paper Hound bookshop) on Pender near Homer Street in the Victoria Block. 2015. Author’s photo.

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The Burger with the Brand (1954)

VPL 82512-A Twin Steer Drive-in restaurant, 2805 Cambie Street, convertible automobile, driver, carhop in western costumes, neon sign, twin steers brand on hamburger bun, 1954. Artray photo.

VPL 82512-A Twin Steer Drive-in restaurant, 2805 Cambie Street, convertible automobile, driver, carhop in western costumes, neon sign, twin steers brand on hamburger bun, 1954. Artray photo. (Note: No prints were available, so I photographed the negative and digitally produced a positive; the appearance of bubble wrap in the background isn’t your imagination. It was placed on the light table by the VPL librarian beneath the negative to protect it). The attribution of a letter (A and B) to these two photos was my doing and was an arbitrary choice to keep these photos straight in my records.

These photos were made by Artray apparently to accompany advertising copy. These two were part of a series of several similar images.

VPL 82512B Twin Steer Drive-in restaurant, 2805 Cambie Street, convertible automobile, driver, carhop in western costumes, neon sign, twin steers brand on hamburger bun, 1954. Artray photo.

VPL 82512-B Twin Steer Drive-in restaurant, 2805 Cambie Street, convertible automobile, driver, carhop in western costumes, neon sign, twin steers brand on hamburger bun, 1954. Artray photo.

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Get a Honey at Brasso’s (1956)

VPL 83053 Neon Signs, Ad Billboards, 3200 Block Kingsway Brasso's Car Supermarket, Harveys Burgers, Night and Day, 1956. Vic Spooner photo.

VPL 83053. Neon Signs, Ad Billboards, 3200 Block (cross-street: MacPherson) Kingsway Brasso’s Car Supermarket, Harveys Burgers (19-cents!), 1956. Vic Spooner photo. (Note: No print was available of this image, so I photographed the negative and then turned it into a digital positive).

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“Hap” O’Connor, Umpire

CVA 99-1978 – Hap O’Conner (sic: O’Connor), baseball umpire, 1929. Stuart Thomson photo.

Elroy Joseph (Hap) O’Connor (not O’Conner, as CVA currently has it) was an American baseball umpire for 40+ years. Evidently, he was umping in Vancouver for a game in 1929. He died in San Bernardino county, CA in 1957.

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The Original Cellar, 2514 Watson (1956-63)

The original Cellar jazz club. 2514 Watson Street (just off Broadway near Main), 1961. CBC Vancouver Media Archives.

The original Cellar jazz club. 1961. CBC Vancouver Media Archives.

Partly visible behind the head of the fellow far left is The Trio (1954), an enamelled linocut by Vancouver artist Harry Webb.

Go here for the only known film images of the original Cellar club (and a few seconds showing bearded artist Harry Webb at work there, I believe).

For more about Harry and Jessie Webb, I highly recommend The Life and Art of Harry and Jessie Webb by Adrienne Brown (Salt Spring Island: Mother Tongue Publishing), 2014.

the-cellar-222-east-broadway-marxh-21-1961-cbc-archivefranz-lundner-photo

The Cellar (222 East Broadway). Marxh 21, 1961. CBC Archive/Franz Lundner photo.

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Who is He When Not in His (Sentry) Box (1914-18)?

Mil P76 - [Sentry on duty outside Beatty Street Drill Hall], 1914-18.

Mil P76 – [Sentry on duty outside Beatty Street Drill Hall], 1914-18.

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De Dutch Burger Poll!

CVA 180-6973 - Frying Dutchman concession (at PNE), 1972. Bob Tipple photo

CVA 180-6973 – Frying Dutchman concession (at PNE), 1972. Bob Tipple photo

This post is in recognition of the provincial general election in my home province of Alberta today.

The photo is of The Frying Dutchman concession stand at the 1972 Pacific National Exhibition (PNE). In B.C., from 1939-82, election polling during provincial elections was effectively banned. Vancouver Sun columnist, Vaughn Palmer, described how the founder of De Dutch Pannekoek House got around this ban:

…[S]tarting with the 1963 provincial election, restaurateur John Dys, the self-styled Frying Dutchman (and later founder of De Dutch Pannekoek House chain) found a way around the ban that was as subversive as it was entertaining.

Patrons to his then-modest trio of food service outlets were invited to choose among four hamburgers, each priced at 49 cents (those were the days) and distinguishable only by being named after one of the leaders of the four parties contending that year’s election.

Dys began posting the results in the window of his restaurant in downtown Vancouver partway through the campaign, promptly drawing a threat of prosecution from provincial officials. Armed with legal advice that his patrons were not really choosing among candidates, only among hamburgers, he did not back down.

Dys’ polls correctly forecast the success of W.A.C. Bennett’s Social Credit Party in forming a government in 1963 and the win of Dave Barrett’s New Democratic Party in 1972. The results of “today’s straw poll” for the ongoing 1972 federal election indicate that Dys’ burger poll would again prove broadly accurate. The results of the 1972 federal election were:
Pierre Trudeau (Liberal): 38.42% (Burger Poll: 49.12%)
Robert Stanfield (PC): 35.02% (BP: 20.40%)
David Lewis (NDP): 17.83% (BP: 22.67%)
Real Caouette (Social Credit): 7.55% (BP: 7.81%)

Trudeau formed a minority government in 1972 with the NDP holding the balance of power for a couple years.

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Caretaker, Beatty Street Drill Hall (1973)

CVA 677-922 - Beatty Street Armoury [620 Beatty Street] caretaker [sitting in office area]. 1973. Art Grice, F 11 Photographics.

CVA 677-922 – Beatty Street Armoury [620 Beatty Street] caretaker [sitting in office area]. 1973. Art Grice, F 11 Photographics.

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Kiss Sunkist Goodbye

CVA 780-238 - [Sunkist Grocery at 1101 East 13th Avenue] Corner East 13th and Glen Drive, Aug 1978.

CVA 780-238 – [Sunkist Grocery at 1101 East 13th Avenue] Corner East 13th and Glen Drive, Aug 1978.

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Strathcona Lane

CVA 800-199 - L:W Hawkes Union St - L:S Union. Res street; laneway behind 708 Hawkes Ave. 1978. Al Ingram photo.

CVA 800-199 – L:W Hawkes Union St – L:S Union. Res street; laneway behind 708 Hawkes Ave. 1978. Al Ingram photo.

The image above shows a former back lane in 1978, apparently then used principally for accessing the garage of 808 Hawkes Avenue (home on the right; not visible). The image below was made this week. It shows the home on the left and the former back lane; but the lane is apparently now not used for its former purpose. It appears now to have been (poorly) fenced off — perhaps as private property of one of the homes pictured. The garage, today, doesn’t seem to be used for that purpose.

IMG_9916

Former back lane behind 808 Hawkes Avenue. Author’s photo. 2015.

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We’re Here for Joe

CVA 180-7542 – Progressive Conservative Party trailer on [PNE] grounds. 1978. Bob Tipple photo. (Image has been slightly cropped and the colour of the original image has been adjusted; the white balance was awry).

This image was made during the 1978 Pacific National Exhibition (PNE) at Hastings Park. It takes me back to the beginnings of my political awareness, Joe Clark’s all-too-brief period as the last of the Red Tory leaders of the Progressive Conservative Party (Stephen Harper and Co., I suspect, would consider “Red Tory” to be either an oxymoron, or a curse word).

The fellow facing the camera appears to be the candidate and then-M.P. for the riding of Fraser Valley, West, Robert L. Wenman. He was first elected in that constituency in 1974 and was subsequently re-elected in 1979, 1980 (following the conclusion of Prime Minister Clark’s brief government and the resurrection of Trudeau to lead the Liberal Party back into power), 1984, and 1988. Before running as a federal candidate, he trained as a teacher in Saskatchewan (where he was born and raised) and was elected in 1966 (and re-elected in 1969) as a Social Credit MLA in BC’s legislature. He died in 1995, a relatively young man (54), after contracting a bacterial infection while on a business trip to Asia.

For more about Robert L. Wenman and his political careers, see here and here.

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Wilson’s

LGN 998 – [Illuminated sign for Cascade Beer, located on top of commercial buildings at Granville and Cordova Streets], 191- . BCER.

This retail corner (SE Cordova and Granville) was anchored by a newspaper vendor called The Checking Depot in the 1910s (I suspect that this image was made in 1914 – the only year I could identify in BC Directories in which most of the shops pictured existed). Next door was Taylor and Young: Marine and Stationary Engines; adjacent to that, Momsen & Rowe: General Shipping Agents. And next door to Momsen & Rowe was Great Northern Express Co (presumably the shipping arm of the Great Northern Railway). Running east of The Checking Depot up Cordova there was (according to BC Directoires) a rooming house, a barber shop, and a restaurant.

CVA 99-2262 - [View of shops in the 300 block Granville Street and C.P.R. Station at 601 Cordova Street West] taken for Duker and Shaw Billboards Ltd., ca1926. Stuart Thomson photo.

CVA 99-2262 – [View of shops in the 300 block Granville Street and C.P.R. Station at 601 Cordova Street West] taken for Duker and Shaw Billboards Ltd., ca1926. Stuart Thomson photo.

The image above is the same corner a decade later. The third CPR Station (now Waterfront Station) had been built (1914) and is visible in the background (note that the WWI tribute sculpture at that time was at the opposite end of the station from where it is today). Except for The Checking Depot, none of the Granville-facing retail units are the same. In place of Taylor & Young is Lando Fur Co., and W. L. Webber: The Stationery Shop is in Momsen & Rowe‘s former quarters. Standing where the Great Northern Express office once was are Royal Transfer Co. and American Railway Express offices.

CVA 1184-3275 – [Wilson’s Newspapers, corner of Granville Street and Cordova], 1940-48. Jack Lindsay.

By the 1940s, there was a newspaper anchor of a different name at Cordova and Granville. The former Checking Depot was now Wilson’s Newspapers. Wilson’s appears to have been well-stocked. The list of “Daily Papers” on the chalkboard at the Granville entry seems to have been extensive. And they bragged that “Irish, Scotch, and English Papers” were available.

It is difficult to make out the retail shops running east of Wilson’s on Cordova, but using VPL’s BC Directories, it’s probably safe to deduce that the bell-shaped sign in the middle distance serves to advertise Dinner Bell Cafe and Dinner Bell Cigar Stand. The taxi stand is probably for Safe-Way Taxis. This image doesn’t afford a look up Granville Street to see whether any of the retail outlets from previous decades were extant. But, once again, BC Directories came to the rescue: Lando Furs and Railway Express were still present. But added to the retail mix is a shop called Wigwam Souvenirs.

VPL ____ 1952 Cordova Western Extension

VPL 81747 Showing projected Cordova Street extension at Granville Street. Art Jones, 1952. (VAIW Notes: Note the location of CP’s war memorial sculpture, at the west end of the station (not visible). Today, it is located at the other end of Waterfront Station. There was no print of this image at the time of this post. I made a photo of VPL’s negative and then processed the negative image into a positive, digitally).

The reason I’m including this image in the series is because, prior to 1952, Cordova ended at Granville. After that year, however, the street was extended west to Burrard Street. Wilson’s was still on the corner in 1952 (and endured at this site at least until 1961). But none of the other shops is visible.

IMG_3562

Parking garage at Cordova and Granville. Author’s photo, 2015.

I don’t know how long the parking garage has been on the corner. But, judging from the final image in this series (below) it’s been there at least since the mid-1970s.

This final photo in the series gives us a glimpse a bit further east up Cordova than we’ve had with earlier images. The Grandview Hotel (at some periods in its history, known as Austin’s Grand View Hotel) had been there since the early years of the century (about 1903); the St. Francis Hotel (at SW Cordova and Seymour) had been at that site from about 1907 (before that, there was a rooming house or hotel known as Revere House, later replaced by the White Swan Hotel).

The Sears sign in the distance marks the site of the iconic building which housed Spencer’s Department Store (from 1928-48) and which would later be home to two other department stores: Eaton’s (1948-70s) and, in a pattern which would be repeated several years later at Pacific Centre, Sears (1970s-80s). Sears ultimately realized it couldn’t make a go of it on this site, and cried “uncle”, turning the building over to Burnaby-based Simon Fraser University (SFU) to become its downtown Vancouver site. The SFU property became known as Harbour Centre Tower.

CVA 2010-006.267 - Looking east on Cordova from Granville St. 1976 Ernie Reksten

CVA 2010-006.267 – Looking east on Cordova from Granville St. 1976. Ernie Reksten photo.

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Dairy, Apartment Block, Big Box

VPL 20850 Standard Milk Co and Delivery Wagons, 2329 Yukon Street. June 1920. Dominion Photo.

The early image above was made at the 2300 block of Yukon Street (near 7th Avenue  and Cambie Street). Later, this block became less industrial and more residential. The wood frame apartment block which appears below was on the same side of the block (2347 Yukon).

CVA 780-255 – [Apartment building at] 2347 Yukon [Street], 1960-80.

CVA’s date range for this image seems needlessly wide. The yellow vehicle is a Ford Pinto, which started production in 1971; other cars and trucks in the image are, according to expert Wes, of similar vintage or older. License plates are too blurry to be of much direct assistance with dates. But the plates on the Pinto and the Nova SS ahead of it seem to be blue on white and appear not to have any of the post-1985 month/year-of-expiry decals. So I’m going to be conservative and date the image as between 1971 and 1978 (but, given the apparent rust and fading on the Pinto, more likely 1973-78).

 Today, this is part of the site of big box stores, Winners, Home Depot, Save On Foods, and Canadian Tire.

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Meet me at Birk’s Clock

Detail:crop of CVA 772-7 – [Granville Street at Georgia Street, looking south], 1951.

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’72 PNE: Lower-Brow Entertainment

CVA 180-6984 – 1972 P.N.E., south-west corner of tent – cars belong to demolition derby – [Legion Bingo tent on P.N.E. grounds], 1972.

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Three Boys in 1891

CVA 677-813 - [Three boys at fence, including] Wm. Hood and Eddie Goddard. 1891. A. Savard photo.

CVA 677-813 – [Three boys at fence, including] Wm. Hood and Eddie Goddard. 1891. A. Savard photo.

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Banjo King at Tea for Opening of Burrard Bridge

CVA 99-2723 - Eddie Peabody at Hotel Vancouver with Burrard Bridge cake, 1 July 1932.  Stuart Thomson photo,

CVA 99-2723 – Eddie Peabody at Hotel Vancouver with Burrard Bridge cake, 1 July 1932. Stuart Thomson photo,

This image puzzled me at first. When I first saw it, I assumed that the people were at the head table of the tea following the opening ceremonies of the Burrard Bridge. But why would world-renowned vaudeville banjoist (centre), Eddie Peabody, be at the head table at such a celebration? I couldn’t find a connection. Then I looked more closely at the image and realized that everyone was standing behind the Bridge Cake. I suspect that groups of guests trooped up to have their photos taken with the cake. This wasn’t a head table image. I assume that Peabody was in Vanocuver on a gig and was invited to come along to the Burrard Bridge tea. (And because photographer Stuart Thomson was no dummy, he realized that a photo of Eddie Peabody with the cake would be more interesting than another image of the Mayor (L D Taylor had been mayor of the city for 8 years in 1932, so another image of him wouldn’t be very novel).

In the spirit of the fun on that day, here is another image of Eddie and whoever the other gent is!